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N Scale - Bachmann - 5124 - Boxcar, 40 Foot, Hi-Cube - Santa Fe - 14024

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Stock Number 5124
Original Retail Price $1.50
Brand Bachmann
Manufacturer Bachmann
Body Style Bachmann Boxcar 41 Foot Hi-Cube Smooth Sides
Prototype Vehicle Boxcar, 40 Foot, Hi-Cube (Details)
Road or Company Name Santa Fe (Details)
Reporting Marks ATSF
Road or Reporting Number 14024
Paint Color(s) Red
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
Release Date 1972-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Boxcar
Model Subtype 41 Foot
Model Variety Hi-Cube
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)



Specific Item Information: Bottom of car shows Bachmann Hong Kong.

Model Information: This model first appeared in the 1972 Bachmann catalog. It was originally released with 6 road names and priced at $1.50 each.

Prototype History:
The forty foot, 70 ton, Hi-Cube boxcars were built in the mid-1960’s specifically for high volume low weight cargo and were most often used in captive service between appliance manufacturers and distributors. They occasionally branched out into furniture and paper loads. Manufactured by Pacific Car and Foundry and Pullman-Standard ultimately their small size, and the load limitations this imposed saw them leave the rails in a relatively short time.

The forty footers lost out to the 60ft High-Cubes, which could haul a larger load. However, there is photographic evidence of the cars riding the rails until at least the beginning of august 1984. Externally the cars had an overall coupled length of 45’ 5”, a maximum width of 10’ 8” and stood at their highest 16’ 10” above the rail height. It should be noted that the 1969 ORER shows the 11 SP cars one inch higher at 16’ 11”.

Road Name History:
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight transport, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway). Its bus line extended passenger transportation to areas not accessible by rail, and ferryboats on the San Francisco Bay allowed travelers to complete their westward journeys to the Pacific Ocean. The ATSF was the subject of a popular song, Harry Warren & Johnny Mercer's "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", written for the film, The Harvey Girls (1946).

The railroad officially ceased operations on December 31, 1996, when it merged with the Burlington Northern Railroad to form the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Bachmann Industries (Bachmann Brothers, Inc.) is a Bermuda registered Chinese owned company, globally headquartered in Hong Kong; specializing in model railroading.

Founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the home of its North American headquarters, Bachmann is today part of the Kader group, who model products are made at a Chinese Government joint-venture plant in Dongguan, China. Bachmann's brand is the largest seller, in terms of volume, of model trains in the world. Bachmann primarily specializes in entry level train sets, and premium offerings in many scales. The Spectrum line is the high quality, model railroad product line, offered in N, HO, Large Scale, On30, and Williams O gauge all aimed for the hobbyist market. Bachmann is the producer of the famous railroad village product line known as "Plasticville." The turnover for Bachmann model trains for the year ended 31 December 2006 was approximately $46.87 million, a slight increase of 3.36% as compared to 2005.

Item created by: Chance on 2017-02-15 10:14:40. Last edited by gdm on 2020-05-30 09:02:36

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