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N Scale - Micro-Trains - 135 00 111 - Container Car, Single Well, Gunderson Husky Stack 48 - Southern Pacific - 513958A

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N Scale - Micro-Trains - 135 00 111 - Container Car, Single Well, Gunderson Husky Stack 48 - Southern Pacific - 513958A Copyright held by TroveStar


N Scale - Micro-Trains - 135 00 111 - Container Car, Single Well, Gunderson Husky Stack 48 - Southern Pacific - 513958A Image Courtesy of Micro-Trains Line


Brand Micro-Trains
Stock Number 135 00 111
Secondary Stock Number 135 00 111
Original Retail Price $29.90
Manufacturer Micro-Trains Line
Production Type Regular Production
Image Provider's Website Link
Body Style Micro Trains Container Car Husky Stack
Prototype Container Car, Single Well, Gunderson Husky Stack 48 (Details)
Road or Company Name Southern Pacific (Details)
Reporting Marks SP
Road or Reporting Number 513958A
Paint Color(s) Dark Red
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Standard
Body Material Diecast
Announcement Date 2018-06-01
Release Date 2018-06-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Container Car
Model Subtype Well
Model Variety Gunderson Husky Stack
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era V: Modern (1979 - Present)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: These 70’ husky stack well cars are red with white lettering and run on ASF Ride Control Trucks. Built late in Southern Pacific’s lifespan in 1992, these Gunderson Husky-Stack 125-ton well cars would accommodate containers up to 48’ in the lower well position. The Husky-Stack® well car was first introduced in 1990 at the International Intermodal Expo in Atlanta, GA.

Model Information: Micro-Trains first introduced this body style in February of 2017 and represents MTL's first venture into modern Intermodal railcars. This model features new ASF Ride Control Trucks.

There are some issues fitting 48 foot containers into the well. We suspect that Micro-Trains's measurements were extremely accurate in calculating the width of the well, but that some of the older container designs were not so accurate. Unfortunately this has resulted in some containers simply being to wide to sit in the well without filing or modification. We tested Walthers, Deluxe, Con-Cor, Micro-Trains and Kato containers. The Kato's, the MTL's and the Con-Cor containers all fit nicely. The Deluxe smooth side 48's and the Walthers rib side 48's are too wide. We also tested these same containers with the MDC-Roundhouse-Athearn GHC model as well as with the Walthers Thrall well car, and the same containers fit well in these other cars.

Prototype History:
Double-stack container trains first hit the rails for regular service in 1981. The Southern Pacific Railroad had developed the idea to provide service for the Sea- Land maritime shipping company. SP's pioneering double-stack service let Sea- Land's containers take a shortcut from the west coast to the Gulf of Mexico bypassing the Panama Canal. From prototype car to production order, the SP spent a little over four years on the double-stack development project. The SP's double-stack cars featured unwieldy bulkheads on each end to prevent the loose top container from blowing off of the car. A new group at Greenbrier Intermodal designed a similar bulkhead car, even as other companies were starting to leave the bulkheads off of their stack cars. The support for the upper container came from inter-box connectors (IBCs) which had been used for years in oceangoing container shipping. Greenbrier and their car builder, Gunderson, wanted to get in on that market, and did so with their Maxi-Stack cars. But there was another new market out there: developing a single, two-truck stack car. Almost all of the existing cars in service were articulated, with the exception of one SP prototype car.

David DeBoer, a co-founder of Greenbrier, had been seeking to fill this single-well stack car niche, despite the "intermodal experts" at Trailer Train Corp. insisting that the only single-well car that could ride smoothly was a European-style 2-axle car. (In fact, it was DeBoer who wrote the reference book I used for much of this background. His Piggyback and Containers is a highly recommended read, and it was my first review item for MRN.) DeBoer sought advice from his retired former boss at the SP. This pitted the Doubting Thomases at TTX up against Bill Thomford, who had developed the SP's double-stack prototypes. Thomford laughed off Trailer Train's existence, pointing out that his own single-well, two-truck stack car had a million miles of reliable service under its belt. DeBoer went back to Greenbrier and the company got to work designing the car that TTX said was doomed to failure.

In 1990, Gunderson turned out the Husky Stack. Test engineers proved Thomford right, and the cars tracked perfectly. Trailer Train ended up reversing their initial claims and ordering 150 Husky Stack cars built with 48-foot wells in 1991. The Burlington Northern also ordered 75 cars and other buyers lined up later. The original 1991 model cars are still going strong for many different owners, including Trailer Train.

Husky Stack development has continued today, with the introduction of 53-foot wells and the "All-Purpose" Husky Stack, with trailer hitches on each end. In Greenbrier terms, the car is named the HS53 for the 53-foot well version.

Road Name History:
The Southern Pacific Transportation Company (reporting mark SP), earlier Southern Pacific Railroad and Southern Pacific Company, and usually called the Southern Pacific or (from the railroad's initials) Espee, was an American Class I railroad. It was absorbed in 1988 by the company that controlled the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad and eight years later became part of the Union Pacific Railroad.

The railroad was founded as a land holding company in 1865, later acquiring the Central Pacific Railroad by lease. By 1900 the Southern Pacific Company was a major railroad system incorporating many smaller companies, such as the Texas and New Orleans Railroad and Morgan's Louisiana and Texas Railroad. It extended from New Orleans through Texas to El Paso, across New Mexico and through Tucson, to Los Angeles, through most of California, including San Francisco and Sacramento. Central Pacific lines extended east across Nevada to Ogden, Utah, and reached north through Oregon to Portland. Other subsidiaries eventually included the St. Louis Southwestern Railway (Cotton Belt), the Northwestern Pacific Railroad at 328 miles (528 km), the 1,331 miles (2,142 km) Southern Pacific Railroad of Mexico, and a variety of 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge routes.

In 1929 SP/T&NO operated 13848 route-miles not including Cotton Belt, whose purchase of the Golden State Route circa 1980 nearly doubled its size to 3,085 miles (4,965 km), bringing total SP/SSW mileage to around 13,508 miles (21,739 km).

By the 1980s route mileage had dropped to 10,423 miles (16,774 km), mainly due to the pruning of branch lines. In 1988 the Southern Pacific was taken over by D&RGW parent Rio Grande Industries. The combined railroad kept the Southern Pacific name due to its brand recognition in the railroad industry and with customers of both constituent railroads. Along with the addition of the SPCSL Corporation route from Chicago to St. Louis, the total length of the D&RGW/SP/SSW system was 15,959 miles (25,684 km).

By 1996 years of financial problems had dropped SP's mileage to 13,715 miles (22,072 km), and it was taken over by the Union Pacific Railroad.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information: Micro-Trains is the brand name used by both Kadee Quality Products and Micro-Trains Line. For a history of the relationship between the brand and the two companies, please consult our Micro-Trains Collector's Guide.

Manufacturer Information:
Micro-Trains Line split off from Kadee Quality Products in 1990. Kadee Quality Products originally got involved in N-Scale by producing a scaled-down version of their successful HO Magne-Matic knuckle coupler system. This coupler was superior to the ubiquitous 'Rapido' style coupler due to two primary factors: superior realistic appearance and the ability to automatically uncouple when stopped over a magnet embedded in a section of track. The success of these couplers in N-Scale quickly translated to the production of trucks, wheels and in 1972 a release of ready-to-run box cars.

Micro-Trains Line Co. split off from Kadee in 1990 to form a completely independent company. For this reason, products from this company can appear with labels from both enterprises. Due to the nature of production idiosyncrasies and various random factors, the rolling stock from Micro-Trains can have all sorts of interesting variations in both their packaging as well as the products themselves. When acquiring an MTL product it is very important to understand these important production variations that can greatly enhance (or decrease) the value of your purchase.

Item created by: gdm on 2018-06-04 12:03:37. Last edited by gdm on 2019-05-19 13:22:50

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