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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-04011G - Passenger Car, Smoothside, 85 Foot Sleeper - Santa Fe

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Stock Number 0001-04011G
Secondary Stock Number 4011G
Brand Con-Cor
Manufacturer Con-Cor
Body Style Con-Cor Passenger Smoothside 85 Foot Sleeper
Prototype Vehicle Passenger Car, Lightweight, Smoothside (Details)
Prototype Passenger Car, Smoothside, 85 Foot Sleeper
Road or Company Name Santa Fe (Details)
Paint Color(s) Silver with Black, Yellow and Red Stripe
Print Color(s) Black
Paint Scheme Valley Flyer
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Item Category Passenger Cars
Model Type Lightweight/Streamlined
Model Subtype Smoothside
Model Variety 85 Foot Sleeper
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)



Model Information: This model has been around for a while. The originals were produced by Kato Japan operating as Sekisui Kinzoku. Later versions were made in China. The models are based on prototypes from the late 1950's and reasonably accurate though somewhat "generic". As of 2016, these have been produced in 40 road names across 7 different varieties for a total of 280 cars. Each road name has a Baggage-Mail, Baggage, Coach, Sleeper, Dome, Diner and Observation variety

The models are currently available in both Micro-Trains Magnetmatic? couplers as well as Con-Cor's "Rigid Face" couplers. They are fully assembled "RTR" models with detailed interiors, and add-on lighting kits are separately available.

Prototype History:
In the post-war period, passenger rail service boomed. In order to increase efficiency, the railroads set to replacing their old wood, steel and concrete heavyweight passenger cars with newer lightweight, streamlined cars. The new cars were made from stainless steel, aluminum and Cor-Ten steel. These cars required less motive power to pull and were cheaper to manufacture. Production was also concentrated in a few manufacturers rather than each railroad making its own. This led to standardization which further reduced costs. The new "lightweight" cars were also given "streamlined" designs to make them more visually appealing. Budd, Pullman Standard and ACF were all well known manufacturers of these cars.

Smoothside cars are typically painted, unlike their corrugated brethren. This meant that they typically required more maintenance, but this also allowed the railroads to apply distinctive paint schemes to their fleets, typically matching the paintwork on their locomotives.

Road Name History:
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight transport, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway). Its bus line extended passenger transportation to areas not accessible by rail, and ferryboats on the San Francisco Bay allowed travelers to complete their westward journeys to the Pacific Ocean. The ATSF was the subject of a popular song, Harry Warren & Johnny Mercer's "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", written for the film, The Harvey Girls (1946).

The railroad officially ceased operations on December 31, 1996, when it merged with the Burlington Northern Railroad to form the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Con-Cor has been in business since 1962. Many things have changed over time as originally they were a complete manufacturing operation in the USA and at one time had upwards of 45 employees. They not only designed the models,but they also built their own molds, did injection molding, painting, printing and packaging on their models.

Currently, most of their manufacturing has been moved overseas and now they import 90% of their products as totally finished goods, or in finished components. They only do some incidental manufacturing today within the USA.

Important Note: The Con-Cor product numbering can be very confusing. Please see here in the article how to properly enter Con-Cor stock numbers in the TroveStar database.

Item created by: klausnahr on 2020-11-08 06:35:37. Last edited by Alain LM on 2020-11-22 06:17:42

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