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Vehicle - Rail - Rolling Stock (Freight) - Reefer - Ice, 40 Foot, Wood

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Vehicle - Rail - Rolling Stock (Freight) - Reefer - Ice, 40 Foot, Wood

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Name Reefer, Ice, 40 Foot, Wood
Region North America
Category Rail
Type Rolling Stock (Freight)
SubType Reefer
Variety Ice, 40 Foot, Wood
Manufacturer Rio Grande (Details)
Era Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Source of Text Miscellaneous
Text Credit URL Link
Year(s) of Production 1924-1926



History: In 1924 and 1926, the D&RGW shops in Alamosa built one last class of refrigerator cars, still made mostly of wood: twenty "long" reefers, with a length of 40ft and a capacity of 25 tons (#150 to 169). They rode on Andrews trucks and were designed to have the same capacity as a small standard gauge refrigerator car, to facilitate transhipments at the gauge changing points. In 1967, 12 of these refrigerator cars were still active on the Rio Grande. Today, four long reefers are conserved on the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad (#157, 163, 166 and 169), two at the Colorado Railroad Museum (#159 and 167), one on the Georgetown Loop Railroad (#153) and #168 is part of the Sumpter Valley Railway collection.

Railroad/Company:
The Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad (reporting mark DRGW), often shortened to Rio Grande, D&RG or D&RGW, formerly the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, was an American Class I railroad company. The railroad started as a 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge line running south from Denver, Colorado in 1870. It served mainly as a transcontinental bridge line between Denver, and Salt Lake City, Utah.

In 1988, the Rio Grande's parent corporation, Rio Grande Industries, purchased Southern Pacific Transportation Company, and as the result of a merger, the larger Southern Pacific Railroad name was chosen for identity. The Rio Grande operated as a separate division of the Southern Pacific, until that company was acquired by the Union Pacific Railroad. Today, most former D&RGW main lines are owned and operated by the Union Pacific while several branch lines are now operated as heritage railways by various companies.

Read more on Wikipedia.


Item Links: We found: 1 different collections associated with Rail - Rolling Stock (Freight) - Reefer - Ice, 40 Foot, Wood
Item created by: Alain LM on 2020-06-27 13:14:14

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