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N Scale - Revell - 2304 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP7 - Frisco - 720

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Stock Number 2304
Brand Revell
Manufacturer Arnold Rapido
Body Style Arnold Rapido Diesel Engine GP7
Prototype Vehicle Locomotive, Diesel, EMD GP7 (Details)
Road or Company Name Frisco (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 720
Paint Color(s) Red & White
Print Color(s) Red
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 1968-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety GP7
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: This model was first announced in the Arnold 1967-68 catalog, together with the GP9 and GP30, all three sharing the same mechanism. Initially offered in one livery per model, these models were subsequently offered with additional roadnames as shown in the 1968-69 catalog.
It was introduced as Revell Rapido, and offered under the usual Arnold Rapido branding after Arnold stopped cooperation with Revell circa 1973.
Arnold decided that GP7 was without dynamic brakes and that GP9 will have them, hence the dynamic brake blister on the roof that was systematically delivered in black regardless of the locomotive color.
Overall this model is reported as an average or poor runner at slow speed, though it can pull quite many cars thanks to its generous weight.
No lights.

DCC Information: No DCC support; not invented yet in 1968.

Prototype History:
The EMD GP7 is a four-axle (B-B) road switcher diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division and General Motors Diesel between October 1949 and May 1954. Power was provided by an EMD 567B 16-cylinder engine which generated 1,500 horsepower (1,119 kW). The GP7 was offered both with and without control cabs, and those built without control cabs were called a GP7B. Five GP7B's were built between March and April 1953. The GP7 was the first EMD road locomotive to use a hood unit design instead of a car-body design. This proved to be more efficient than the car body design as the hood unit cost less to build, was cheaper and easier to maintain, and had much better front and rear visibility for switching.

Of the 2,734 GP7's built, 2,620 were for American railroads (including 5 GP7B units built for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway), 112 were built for Canadian railroads, and 2 were built for Mexican railroads. This was the first model in EMD's GP (General Purpose) series of locomotives. Concurrently, EMD offered a six-axle (C-C) SD (Special Duty) locomotive, the SD7.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History:
The St. Louis - San Francisco Railway (reporting mark SLSF), also known as the Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. At the end of 1970 it operated 4,547 miles (7,318 km) of road on 6,574 miles (10,580 km) miles of track, not including subsidiaries Quanah, Acme and Pacific Railway or the Alabama, Tennessee and Northern Railroad; that year it reported 12,795 million ton-miles of revenue freight and no passengers. It was purchased and absorbed into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1980.

The St. Louis - San Francisco Railway was incorporated in Missouri on September 7, 1876. It was formed from the Missouri Division and Central Division of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. This land grant line was one of two railroads (the other being the M-K-T) authorized to build across Indian Territory. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, ATSF, interested in the A & P right of way across the Mojave Desert to California, took the road over until the larger road went bankrupt in 1893; the receivers retained the western right of way but divested the ATSF of the St. Louis-San Francisco mileage on the great plains. After bankruptcy the Frisco emerged as the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, incorporated on June 29, 1896, which also went bankrupt. On August 24, 1916 the company was reorganized as the St. Louis - San Francisco Railway, though the line never went west of Texas, being more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from San Francisco.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
Revell was Arnold’s importer in the 60s.

Starting in 1967, Arnold and Revell, Inc. of Venice, California entered into a distribution relationship. These new trains would be called MicroTRAINs. The first catalog, dated 1967, shows first generation Arnold rapido F-units on the cover.

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Item created by: CNW400 on 2019-05-30 14:25:41. Last edited by Alain LM on 2021-05-06 10:13:12

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