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N Scale - Revell - 2610 - Maintenance of Way, Wrecking Crane, North America - Frisco

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Stock Number 2610
Brand Revell
Manufacturer Arnold Rapido
Body Style Arnold Rapido Maintenance of Way Equipment
Prototype Vehicle Maintenance of Way, Wrecking Crane, North America (Details)
Road or Company Name Frisco (Details)
Paint Color(s) Grey
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Release Date 1968-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Maintenance of Way
Model Subtype Wrecking Crane
Model Variety With Helper Car
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Prototype History:
A complete wreck train consisted of a locomotive, a wreck crane, tool cars, and enough bunk and cook cars for personnel required for a particular wreck. Wreck cranes and tool cars were often stationed at strategic points along the railway line. Division terminals were considered strategic points because locomotives and engine, train, and wreck car crews were always available on call. Wreck train equipment had to be prepared for immediate movement. Ties, rails, spikes, and other repair materials are stockpiled at various points. An emergency supply of such items were also loaded in suitable cars and held with each wrecker as part of the wreck train.

A wreck train, or “relief train” as the railroads preferred to call them used a huge piece of equipment built by companies such as Brownhoist. A typical wrecking crane was powered by twin diesel engines with a 500,000 pound capacity. This crane could easily lift an entire Reading T-1 steam locomotive. At 191-tons, it is a very heavy piece of equipment. It easily outweighs an Alco C630!

Road Name History:
The St. Louis - San Francisco Railway (reporting mark SLSF), also known as the Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. At the end of 1970 it operated 4,547 miles (7,318 km) of road on 6,574 miles (10,580 km) miles of track, not including subsidiaries Quanah, Acme and Pacific Railway or the Alabama, Tennessee and Northern Railroad; that year it reported 12,795 million ton-miles of revenue freight and no passengers. It was purchased and absorbed into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1980.

The St. Louis - San Francisco Railway was incorporated in Missouri on September 7, 1876. It was formed from the Missouri Division and Central Division of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. This land grant line was one of two railroads (the other being the M-K-T) authorized to build across Indian Territory. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, ATSF, interested in the A & P right of way across the Mojave Desert to California, took the road over until the larger road went bankrupt in 1893; the receivers retained the western right of way but divested the ATSF of the St. Louis-San Francisco mileage on the great plains. After bankruptcy the Frisco emerged as the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, incorporated on June 29, 1896, which also went bankrupt. On August 24, 1916 the company was reorganized as the St. Louis - San Francisco Railway, though the line never went west of Texas, being more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from San Francisco.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
Revell was Arnold’s importer in the 60s.

Starting in 1967, Arnold and Revell, Inc. of Venice, California entered into a distribution relationship. These new trains would be called MicroTRAINs. The first catalog, dated 1967, shows first generation Arnold rapido F-units on the cover.

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Item created by: CNW400 on 2019-03-08 15:38:57. Last edited by gdm on 2020-05-29 13:28:21

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