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N Scale - Bachmann - 53451 - Locomotive, Steam, 4-8-2 Mountain - Southern - 1489

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N Scale - Bachmann - 53451 - Locomotive, Steam, 4-8-2 Mountain - Southern - 1489


Brand Bachmann
Stock Number 53451
Original Retail Price $349.00
Manufacturer Bachmann
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Bachmann Steam Engine 4-8-2 Light Mountain
Prototype Locomotive, Steam, 4-8-2 Mountain (Details)
Road or Company Name Southern (Details)
Reporting Marks SR
Road or Reporting Number 1489
Paint Color(s) Green
Print Color(s) Yellow
Coupler Type E-Z Mate Mark II Magnetic Knuckle
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness DC/DCC Dual Mode Decoder w/Sound
Announcement Date 2019-02-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Steam
Model Subtype 4-8-2
Model Variety Light Mountain
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Bachmann is delighted to offer this N scale 4-8-2 Light Mountain equipped with an Econami™ SoundTraxx® steam package. Factory-set for 4-8-2 realism, the steam package offers a choice of 16 whistles, multiple variations of 6 bell types, 4 prototypical chuffs, 5 airpumps, and 4 dynamos plus cylinder cocks, grade crossing signal, blowdown, brake squeal/release, coupling/uncoupling, water stop, and "All aboard"/coach doors—all in 16-bit polyphonic sound.

Model Information: Bachmann introduced this model in 2003. They revised it in 2012. The early version runs a bit sketchy. The later version runs better. The early version has a split frame chassis with a skew-wound 5-pole motor. It does have traction tires. The later version has a 3-pole motor.

DCC Information: The 2003 version allows installation of a decoder in the tender with all wires for control of motor, power leads and lights terminating somewhere in the tender. A basic decoder with some soldering skills will likely do the trick. The 2012 redo is much easier but I am not sure if there is a factory decoder for this model.

Prototype History:
Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 4-8-2 represents the wheel arrangement of four leading wheels, eight powered and coupled driving wheels and two trailing wheels. This type of steam locomotive is commonly known as the Mountain type.

The 4-8-2 was most popular on the North American continent. When the 4-6-2 Pacific fleets were becoming over-burdened as passenger trains grew in length and weight, the first North American 4-8-2 locomotives were built by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) for the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) in 1911. It is possible that the "Mountain" name was originated by C&O, after the Allegheny Mountains where their first 4-8-2 locomotives were built to work. ALCO combined the traction of the eight-coupled 2-8-2 Mikado with the excellent tracking qualities of the Pacific's four-wheel leading truck. Although C&O intended their new Mountains for passenger service, the type also proved ideal for the new, faster freight services that railroads in the United States were introducing. Many 4-8-2 locomotives were therefore built for dual service.

The New York Central Railroad (NYC) called the 4-8-2 type of steam locomotive the Mohawk type. It was known as the Mountain type on other roads, but the mighty New York Central didn't see the name to be fitting on its famous Water Level Route, so it instead picked the name of one of those rivers its rails followed, the Mohawk River, to name its newest type of locomotive. Despite the more common name, the 4-8-2 was actually suited in many ways more to flatland running than slow mountain slogging, with its 4-wheel leading truck for stability at speed.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History:
The Southern Railway (reporting mark SOU) (also known as Southern Railway Company) was a US class 1 railroad that was based in the Southern United States. It was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894.

At the end of 1970 Southern operated 6,026 miles (9,698 km) of railroad, not including its Class I subsidiaries AGS (528 miles or 850 km) CofG (1729 miles) S&A (167 miles) CNOTP (415 miles) GS&F (454 miles) and twelve Class II subsidiaries. That year Southern itself reported 26111 million net ton-miles of revenue freight and 110 million passenger-miles; AGS reported 3854 and 11, CofG 3595 and 17, S&A 140 and 0, CNO&TP 4906 and 0.3, and GS&F 1431 and 0.3

The railroad joined forces with the Norfolk and Western Railway (N&W) in 1982 to form the Norfolk Southern Corporation. The Norfolk Southern Corporation was created in response to the creation of the CSX Corporation (its rail system was later transformed to CSX Transportation in 1986). The Southern Railway was renamed Norfolk Southern Railway in 1990 and continued under that name ever since. Seven years later in 1997 the railroad absorbed the Norfolk and Western Railway, ending the Norfolk and Western's existence as an independent railroad.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Bachmann Industries (Bachmann Brothers, Inc.) is a Bermuda registered Chinese owned company, globally headquartered in Hong Kong; specializing in model railroading.

Founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the home of its North American headquarters, Bachmann is today part of the Kader group, who model products are made at a Chinese Government joint-venture plant in Dongguan, China. Bachmann's brand is the largest seller, in terms of volume, of model trains in the world. Bachmann primarily specializes in entry level train sets, and premium offerings in many scales. The Spectrum line is the high quality, model railroad product line, offered in N, HO, Large Scale, On30, and Williams O gauge all aimed for the hobbyist market. Bachmann is the producer of the famous railroad village product line known as "Plasticville." The turnover for Bachmann model trains for the year ended 31 December 2006 was approximately $46.87 million, a slight increase of 3.36% as compared to 2005.

Item created by: scottakoltz on 2019-02-11 16:12:37. Last edited by scottakoltz on 2019-02-28 12:35:05

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