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Rolex - 2705 - Antimagnetic - Mens

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Name 2705
Family Antimagnetic
Gender Mens
Movement Valjoux 22 (Details)
Years in Production 1930 - 1939
Case Diameter (mm) 37
Mechanism Manual
Chronometer Yes
Hacking No
Date Function No
Quickset No
Power Reserve (Hours) 42
Frequency (bph) 18,000
Jewel Count 17
Second Hand Sub
Case Material Stainless Steel
Bezel Material Stainless Steel
Crown Position 3 O'Clock
Crystal Material Acrylic
Band Type Strap
Band Material Leather
Band Replaceable Yes



Notes: Rolex, "Antimagnetic", Ref. 2705, circa 1930 . Fine and rare, large, stainless steel "Staybrite" gentleman's wristwatch, with olive shaped button chronograph, registers, tachometer and telemeter.

This watch appears to have a Valjoux 22 mechanism. M.141/ 2 rhodiumed, 17 jewels, lever escapement, monometallic balance, self-compensating Breguet balance-spring.

Mechanism:
This movement is frequently referred to as a Rolex Calibre 14. This is due to the fact that it was one of the only 14 ligne movements used by Rolex. Despite the fact that Rolex required that the "Rolex" marque be applied to the movement, these chronograph movements were made by Valjoux for Rolex and a host of other watch brands. From the 20s to the mid 80s, Rolex would use Valjoux ebauches like the 14 lines 22 and the smaller 13 lines Valjoux 23 (both twin subdial chronographs) and eventually, they would switch to the Valjoux 72c. That said, Rolex made very few modifications and in terms of high horology, Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe made such modifications and finishing that the final raw chronograph calibres resembled nothing which left the Valjoux assembly line.

The Valjoux 22 and similar Valjoux 71 are chronograph movements produced by Valjoux and later ETA for 60 years, from 1914 through 1974. The Valjoux 22 family was originally designed for pocket watches and is thus a larger movement than is typical for those years, measuring 14 ligne or 31.3 mm. Like its smaller brother, the Valjoux 23, it is a nine-column column wheel chronograph with subsidiary seconds and a minute counter at 9:00 and 3:00, respectively. Valjoux 71 added an hour counter as well.

From the 20s to the mid 80s, Rolex would use Valjoux ebauches like the 14 lines 22 and the smaller 13 lines Valjoux 23 (both twin subdial chronographs) and eventually, they would switch to the Valjoux 72c. That said, Rolex made very few modifications and in terms of high horology, Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe made such modifications and finishing that the final raw chronograph calibres resembled nothing which left the Valjoux assembly line.

Item created by: gdm on 2018-10-11 19:15:47. Last edited by gdm on 2019-06-12 14:16:27

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