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N Scale - Roundhouse - 8401 - Gondola, 52 Foot, Thrall 2743 - RailGon - 310153

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N Scale - Roundhouse - 8401 - Gondola, 52 Foot, Thrall 2743 - RailGon  - 310153


Brand Roundhouse
Stock Number 8401
Manufacturer MDC Roundhouse
Body Style MDC Gondola 50/52 Foot Thrall/Mill
Prototype Gondola, 52 Foot, Thrall 2743 (Details)
Road or Company Name RailGon (Details)
Reporting Marks GONX
Road or Reporting Number 310153
Paint Color(s) Black and Yellow
Print Color(s) Yellow
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Plastic
Release Date 1979-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Gondola
Model Subtype 52 Foot
Model Variety Thrall/Mill
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era V: Modern (1979 - Present)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: This car was introduced by MDC Roundhouse in the late 1970's and was later acquired by Athearn in June of 2004. They have been marketed by both companies under various designations including "50 Foot Modern Gondola", "52 Foot Thrall Gondola" and "52 Foot Mill Gondola" as well as several other similar sounding names.

The early versions were released with Rapido couplers and later Athearn releases using McHenry couplers. The later MDC releases *might* have been shipped with some other kind of knuckle coupler. In the mid-1980's, as was true with many MDC releases, these cars came in kit form. Some of the newer releases come with loads.

Prototype History:
Introduced by Thrall Car Manufacturing Co., in 1995, with its new interior height of 5' 6" (i.e., a 6" increase in height over the previous standard), the firm's contemporary design for a 52' 6" length 2743 cubic foot capacity gondola car took advantage of a (then) newly allowed increase in Gross Rail Loading (GRL) of 286,000 lbs, which was up from the previous limit of 263,000 lbs.

Acquired by Trinity Industries (now TrinityRail) in 2001, from 1995 to 1999, Thrall produced over 6,700 of the 2743 gondolas.

The manufacture of the 2743 design was resumed by Trinity in 2005.

Road Name History:
The Railgon Company, established in 1979, owned railroad gondola cars available for use by multiple railroads by placing the cars in a cooperative pool.
Railgon (and the similar Railbox Company) are currently subsidiaries of TTX Company, formerly the Trailer Train Company, which is owned by multiple railroads and leases cars to them.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
MDC Roundhouse was founded in California and relocated to Reno Nevada due to statewide restrictions on painting. MDC Roundhouse was a producer of both RTR (Ready-to-Run) and kit versions of N Scale rolling stock as well as RTR locomotives. MDC Roundhouse was purchased by Horizon Hobbies in June of 2004 and merged into their Athearn line.

Unlike many of their contemporaries which contracted with European firms to produce their products, MDC made their own toolings. They made several popular body styles and produced them for road names that many other vendors (even Micro-Trains) wouldn't touch. This made them popular with modelers. Also, their un-assembled "kits" permitted a lower price point so they were popular with "runners" as well as "modelers".

Of particular interest was the attention given to modern 50 foot steel boxcars. They made some attempt to accurately mold the differences into distinct models to represent each of the major prototype manufacturers products. They have distinct toolings not only for the different products from FMC, BFF and PS, but also multiple models for each of these manufacturers including "standard" vs "Youngstown" doors and "waffle" vs. "rib" sides. In total they produced 13 different versions of the 50 foot steel boxcar.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-02-07 14:26:11. Last edited by gdm on 2019-09-24 12:00:46

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