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N Scale - Walthers - 929-8003 - Container Car, Single Well, Thrall Lo-Pac 48 - Florida East Coast - 4477

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N Scale - Walthers - 929-8003 - Container Car, Single Well, Thrall Lo-Pac 48 - Florida East Coast - 4477


Brand Walthers
Stock Number 929-8003
Original Retail Price $24.98
Manufacturer Walthers
Body Style Walthers Container Car Well Thrall
Prototype Container Car, Single Well, Thrall Lo-Pac 48 (Details)
Road or Company Name Florida East Coast (Details)
Reporting Marks FEC
Road or Reporting Number 4477
Paint Color(s) Red
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Diecast
Release Date 2017-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Container Car
Model Subtype Single Well
Model Variety Thrall 48'
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era V: Modern (1979 - Present)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Limited edition - one time run of these car numbers In service 1990s to the present Carries 20', 40' & 48' containers in well and up tp 53' containers stacked Operated as stand-alone and five-unit cars Die cast metal body for maximum weight & outstanding performance Accumate(R) trucks and knuckle couplers Add Walthers SceneMaster(TM) 40' (#949-8800 series) & 48' Containers (#949-8840 series) for more realism, both available separately

Model Information: Model introduced by the end of the 1990's (single cars and 5-articulated car sets). These ready-to-run models feature authentically painted die-cast metal bodies for maximum weight and performance. Cars come equipped with free-rolling trucks.

Prototype History:
Gunderson cars were selling like crazy. So well in fact that Gunderson couldn't keep up with the orders. Thrall wanted in on the business, but couldn't use Gunderson's proprietary design, so they came up with their LoPac 2000 low sided container car. The distinctive rib sides of the Thrall are a ready spotting feature that Thrall cars carry to this day. The Thrall cars were designed to take a 40 foot container in the bottom and a forty footer on top. Some of the cars were equipped with hard points to attach 2 20 footers in each well. All were able to carry a 40, 45, or 48 foot container in the upper position, once the use of IBC's (Inter Box Connectors) became common practice.

The LoPacs were contemporaries of the Twinstack, and sales efforts between the two companies were fevered. The Thrall group reached the lucrative APL company with their car, and snagged a number of sales. They made two distinct versions of the car for APL, and then sold them to other entities. The first was a "normal" well car for use with dry box containers. The second version was a powered version specifically designed to carry reefers. The car was colored red and a generator was mounted at one end. Extension cords were strung from the generator to each individual container to provide power to the reefer units mounted there. The Thrall braking arrangement on this car is the same as the Gunderson on the twinstack- one brakewheel at the B end. In later versions, there is a brakewheel painted orange at both the A and the B end. This arrangement indicates the longer 48 foot wells and dual braking system installed on the more recent production. Thrall has remained a force in Intermodal railroading with their more recent all purpose well car, continued 5 unit production, and many many spine cars. Their most recent product in the intermodal world is a three unit car capable of carrying 53 foot containers in the upper and lower positions of each well.

Road Name History:
The Florida East Coast Railway (reporting mark FEC) is a Class II railroad operating in the U.S. state of Florida and since 2007 has been a subsidiary of Railroad Acquisition Holdings, LLC, itself a subsidiary of Fortress Investment Group, LLC.

The FEC was historically a Class I railroad owned by Florida East Coast Industries (FECI) from 2000-2006, FOXX Holdings from 1983-2000, and the St. Joseph Paper Company prior to 1983.

Built primarily in the last quarter of the 19th century and the first decade of the 20th century, the FEC was a project of Standard Oil principal Henry Morrison Flagler. Flagler originally visited Florida to aid with the health issues faced by his first wife, Mary. A key strategist who worked closely with John D. Rockefeller building the Standard Oil Trust, Henry Flagler noted both a lack of services and great potential during his stay at St. Augustine. He subsequently began what amounted to his second career developing resorts, industries, and communities all along Florida's shores abutting the Atlantic Ocean.

The FEC is possibly best known for building the railroad to Key West, completed in 1912. When the FEC's line from the mainland to Key West was heavily damaged by the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, the State of Florida purchased the remaining right-of-way and bridges south of Dade County, and they were rebuilt into road bridges for vehicle traffic and became known as the Overseas Highway. However, a greater and lasting Flagler legacy was the developments along Florida's eastern coast.

During the Great Depression, control was purchased by heirs of the du Pont family. After 30 years of fragile financial condition, the FEC, under leadership of a new president, Ed Ball, took on the labor unions. Ball claimed the company could not afford the same costs as larger Class 1 railroads and needed to invest saved funds in its infrastructure, fast becoming a safety issue. Using replacement workers, the company and some of its employees engaged in one of the longest and more violent labor conflicts of the 20th century from 1963 until 1977. Ultimately, federal authorities had to intervene to stop the violence, which included bombings, shootings and vandalism. However, the courts ruled in the FEC's favor with regard to the right to employ strikebreakers. During this time, Ball invested heavily in numerous steps to improve its physical plant, installed various forms of automation,was the first US Railroad to operate two man train crews, eliminate cabooses and end all of its passenger services (which were unprofitable) by 1968.

In modern times, the company's primary rail revenues come from its intermodal and rock trains. Since 2007, it has been owned by Fortress Investment Group,[citation needed] which acquired it for over US$3 billion (including non-rail assets). Fortress previously owned conglomerate short line railroad operator RailAmerica, which for a time operated FEC but the two companies never merged; Fortress no longer owns RailAmerica and RailAmerica no longer operates FEC. A former CSX official, James Hertwig, was named as President and Chief Executive Officer of the company effective July 1, 2010.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
Wm. K. Walthers, Inc., was founded in Milwaukee in 1932 -- but really, it started years earlier, when seven-year-old Bill Walthers got his first taste of the hobby with a small, wind-up toy train for Christmas. He continued with the hobby and eventually had an attic layout comprised primarily of his own scratch-built creations. After he wrote a series of articles on building train control and signaling systems, he got so many letters from other modelers that he began manufacturing them. The first ad (in the May issue of The Model Maker) offered a 24-page, 15c catalog that listed rail, couplers, and electrical supplies. Sales were over $500.00 for the first year, and the fledgling company was off to a strong start.

Within five years, Walthers had grown so much that larger quarters were needed. Space was found on Erie Street, where everything -- from milled wood parts to metal castings to decals -- was made in-house. 1937 also saw a new line in HO Scale, featured in its own catalog. Bill brought operating layouts to the 1939 World's Fair, which gave the hobby a big boost. Soon, though, the growing possibility of war overshadowed these successes, and supplies were becoming increasingly difficult to obtain.

During the war, model manufacturers were ordered to stop production in order to conserve critical metal supplies. Walthers produced what it could from nonessential materials. A series of ads in 1943 saw Bill literally scraping the bottom of a barrel! The postwar boom meant rapid growth for the hobby; however, small homes and new families left no room for O scale layouts, and many modelers moved to HO Scale.

The next twenty years brought great change. In 1958, Bill retired and his son Bruce took over. Just as full-size railroads were being hard-hit by new technology, so too were model railroads. Leisure time was spent in front of the TV set, not the train set. In 1960, Walthers became a full-line distributor of other manufacturers' products while continuing expansion of the Walthers lines. By the start of the 1970's, business was booming again, and Bruce's son Phil joined the company.

Expansion and diversification continue under Phil's tenure. The establishment of the Walthers Importing Division added several international lines. The manufacturing plant was modernized. Code 83 track was introduced in 1985, giving layouts more realistic proportions. In 1990, the Cornerstone Series buildings were unveiled. Combining a freight car with a related industry, the Cornerstone Series makes it possible for modelers to duplicate authentic operations, enhancing layout realism. The Train Line Deluxe Sets and locomotives debuted in 1994. These sets feature the detailing of serious models and an affordable price -- allowing newcomers to get started, and then build-on to their first set, rather than replacing it.

In 2005, Walthers purchased Life-Like from Lifoam Industries. With this purchase Walthers acquired the Proto Lines that have become the backbone of their locomotive and rolling stock segments.

Today, Walthers continues to expand, improve and develop a wide range of products. Their latest selection can be found throughout Walthers.com and their printed catalogs, along with items from over 300 other manufacturers.

In December 2017, Lowell Smith announced the ‘purchase of tooling’ of the Walthers line of N Scale passenger cars (sleeper, coach and baggage cars), and in June 2018, Atlas announced that it will purchase all N scale locomotive and rolling stock tooling owned by Walthers, including the Walthers N tooling as well as former Life-Like tooling. This divestment puts an end to Walthers involvement as a manufacturer of N scale rolling-stock, though it will continue its range of N scale structures.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-01-27 08:31:40. Last edited by Alain LM on 2019-07-20 08:41:56

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