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N Scale - Bluford Shops - 14421 - Open Hopper, 3-Bay, 70 Ton 14-Panel - Delaware & Hudson - 9068

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N Scale - Bluford Shops - 14421 - Open Hopper, 3-Bay, 70 Ton 14-Panel - Delaware & Hudson - 9068


Brand Bluford Shops
Stock Number 14421
Original Retail Price $23.95
Manufacturer Bluford
Body Style Bluford Open Hopper 3-Bay 70 Ton 14-Panel
Prototype Description Open Hopper, 3-Bay, 70 Ton 14-Panel
Road or Company Name Delaware & Hudson (Details)
Reporting Marks D&H
Road or Reporting Number 9068
Paint Color(s) Black
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Release Date 2017-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Open Hopper
Model Subtype 3-Bay
Model Variety 70 Ton 14-Panel



Specific Item Information: Ilmenite is the ore from which we get titanium. Prior to the Second World War, the U.S. imported ilmenite from Norway and South Africa. The German invasion of Norway and their U-boats in the Atlantic cut off those supplies. So the government built a railroad from the end of Delaware & Hudson’s branch to North Creek, New York to an ilmenite deposit in Tahawus. D&H would haul ilmenite from this mine for the better part of five decades. Small groups of these cars were interchanged for delivery to processors in New Jersey and the Midwest. These models will be equipped with “ilmenite” loads.

Prototype Description: The AAR had a standard 70 ton rib side hopper as well, however New York Central made changes to the AAR design in 1956 and their variation became popular with more railroads than the AAR stock standard! These cars were lower and shorter than later 90 and 100 ton cars but had more ribs (making for 14 full length panels.) Thirteen of the fifteen ribs were welded in place instead of riveted. These cars were built by a number of builders from 1956 through the late 60s with many serving through the 1990s and perhaps beyond...

Road Name History:
The Delaware and Hudson Canal Company would found the Delaware and Hudson Railway to support its mission of getting fuel to the timber denuded cities of the northeast when it was discovered that 'rock coal' or Anthracite could be burned successfully. In time the railway eclipsed the parent company, and America's brief canal age would be ended by the availability of more powerful traction locomotives, so today the canal is little known. Today the Delaware and Hudson Railway (reporting mark DH) is again a subsidiary railroad that operates in the northeastern United States. Since 1991 it was owned and operated by the Canadian Pacific Railway under the rail subsidiary Soo Line Corporation also controls the Soo Line Railroad, Canadian Pacific Railway is owned by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited.

The name itself originates from the 1823 New York state corporation charter listing the unusual name of "The President, Managers and Company of the Delaware & Hudson Canal Co." authorizing an establishment of "water communication" between the Delaware River and the Hudson River.

Nicknamed "The Bridge Line to New England and Canada," the D&H helped connect New York with Montreal, Quebec and New England. It called itself "North America's oldest continually operated transportation company." Between 1968 & 1984, the D&H was owned by Norfolk & Western. N&W sold it to Guilford Transportation, who cast it into bankruptcy in 1988 and in 1991, the D&H was purchased by Canadian Pacific Railway (CP).

On September 19, 2015, Norfolk Southern Railway assumed control and began operations of their recently acquired Delaware & Hudson "South Line", the 282 miles from Schenectady, New York to Sunbury, Pennsylvania from CP. The Delaware & Hudson "South Line" is a rail route that now consists of three rail lines, the Sunbury Line, the Freight Line, and the Voorhesville Running Track; the Sunbury Line absorbed the original route of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad main line which contains the Nicholson Cutoff during that rail line's history.

Brand/Importer Information:
Bluford Shops began in 2007 as a side project of two model railroad industry veterans, Craig Ross and Steve Rodgers. They saw a gap between road names available on N scale locomotives but not available on cabooses. They commissioned special runs of Atlas cabooses in Atlantic Coast Line, Central of Georgia, Monon, Boston & Maine and Southern plus runs on Grand Trunk Western and Central Vermont on the MDC wooden cabooses. While these were in process, they began to develop their first all new tooling project, 86' Auto Parts Boxcars in double door and quad door editions in N scale. By January of 2008, Bluford Shops became a full time venture. Along with additional N scale freight cars and their own tooling for new cabooses, they have brought their own caboose line to HO scale. They also have their popular Cornfields in both HO and N. The future looks bright as they continue to develop new products for your railroad.

The town of Bluford in southern Illinois featured a small yard on Illinois Central's Edgewood Cutoff (currently part of CN.) The yard included a roundhouse, concrete coaling tower (which still stands) and large ice house. Reefer trains running between the Gulf Coast and Chicago were re-iced in Bluford. Things are more quiet now in Bluford with the remaining tracks in the yard used to stage hoppers for mines to the south and store covered hoppers. Intersecting the IC line in Bluford is Southern Railway's (currently NS) line between Louisville and St. Louis. Traffic on this single track line remains relatively heavy.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-01-27 08:04:45

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