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Ancient Coin - Aelia Ariadne - Tremissis

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Ancient Coin - Aelia Ariadne - Tremissis Pearl Diademed Bust / Cross within Wreath
Subject Aelia Ariadne
Reverse Type Cross
Denomination Tremissis
Primary ID Type RIC
Primary ID 933a X
InscriptionObv AEL ARI AUNE AVG
InscriptionRev CONOB
Material Gold
Earliest 474
Latest Possible Year 515
Mint Constantinople
Size (mm) 14
Weight (gr) 139
Period Imperial
Culture Rome



Additional References: MIRB 17 (for type); cf. Depeyrot 108/6 (same)

Notes: Pearl-diademed and draped bust right / Cross within wreath.

Obverse: Ariadne was a daughter of Leo I and Verina. Her mother was a sister of Basiliscus. Ariadne had a younger sister, Leontia. Leontia was first betrothed to Patricius, a son of Aspar. Their engagement was probably annulled when Aspar and another of his sons, Ardabur, were assassinated in 471. Leontia then married Marcian, a son of Emperor Anthemius. The couple led a failed revolt against Zeno in 478–479. They were exiled to Isauria following their defeat. An unnamed younger brother was born in 463. He died five months following his birth. The only sources about him are a horoscope by Rhetorius and a hagiography of Daniel the Stylite.

She died in Constantinople in 515 and was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles. Anastasius was buried besides her in 518.

Mint: Constantinople (Latin: Constantinopolis) was the capital city of the Roman/Byzantine Empire (330 - 1204 and 1261 - 1453), and also of the brief Latin (1204 - 1261), and the later Ottoman (1453 - 1924) empires. It was reinaugurated in 324 AD at ancient Byzantium, as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Emperor Constantine the Great, after whom it was named, and dedicated on 11 May 330.

Period: Imperial Rome. As the Roman Republic began to implode because of corruption and infighting among powerful members of the Roman Senate, a new type of Roman Republican coinage emerges, that of the military strongmen who dominated and fought among each other before the final fall of the Republic. The drama surrounding the fall of the Roman Republic is a story full of political intrigue, military action, betrayal, murder and sex scandals. Different parts of this story have been told and retold by ancient historians, modern day scholars, dozens of Hollywood movies and even an HBO miniseries. All of the actors in this great drama, Crassus, Pompey, Julius Caesar, Brutus and Cassius, Mark Antony and Cleopatra and the last man standing at the end of it all, Octavian (later known as the first emperor of Rome, Emperor Augustus) all minted coins during this time bearing their names and propaganda images supporting their factions and political ideals.

Culture: Ancient Rome. A famous catch phrase "Rome was not built in a day" definitely applies to the Roman civilization. Rome stated as a series of small villages among the famous seven hills of Rome along the river Tiber. Eventually through conquest, diplomacy, wise policies of indirect rule and assimilation, the Romans were able to not only unify the Italian peninsula, but though a series of brutal wars against regional powers established a great Empire that spanned Europe, Asia and Africa, making the Mediterrean Sea and "Roman Lake."

All Roman coinage can generally be divided into eight time periods as described below. An interesting thing about Roman coins minted during these eight time periods is that you can literally see the "Rise and Fall" of the Roman Empire on its coinage as the sharp imagery and pure silver and gold coins of the Roman Republic and Early Imperial Period gradually devolves into crude, illegible and heavily debased coins of the "Barracks Emperors" and "Barbarian" Period.

Item created by: gdm on 2016-08-14 13:45:16. Last edited by gdm on 2016-08-14 16:28:34

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