Search : Mkt:

Rail - Locomotive - Diesel - Fairbanks Morse H-16-44

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

Rail - Locomotive - Diesel - Fairbanks Morse H-16-44 From American-Rails.com

This item has an image gallery.
Click on the picture to see more images.
Name Locomotive, Diesel, Fairbanks Morse, H-16-44
Region North America
Category Rail
Type Locomotive
SubType Diesel
Variety Fairbanks Morse H-16-44
Manufacturer Fairbanks Morse (Details)
Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Year(s) of Production 1950-1963



People who viewed this item also viewed: 112096, 115605, 113010, 135171, 139809

History: The FM H-16-44 was a road switcher produced by Fairbanks-Morse from April 1950 – February 1963. The locomotive shared an identical platform and carbody with the predecessor Model FM H-15-44 (but not the FM H-20-44 end cab road switcher which used a different carbody and frame and a larger prime mover), and were equipped with the same eight-cylinder opposed piston engine that had been uprated to 1,600 horsepower (1,200 kW). The H-16-44 was configured in a B-B wheel arrangement, mounted atop a pair of two-axle AAR Type-B road trucks with all axles powered. In late 1950, the AAR trucks were almost exclusively replaced with the same units found on the company's "C-liner" locomotives.

The FM H-16-44 would prove the builder's most successful road-switcher of the five Fairbanks-Morse ultimately cataloged. Not only did this particularly locomotive see strong sales but the company also found a variety of buyers including foreign lines in Mexico as well as orders through its subsidiary, the Canadian Locomotive Company. 209 were built for American railroads, 58 were manufactured from March 1955 – June 1957 by the Canadian Locomotive Company for use in Canada, and 32 units were exported to Mexico.

From Wikipedia
Read more on American-Rails.com

Full F-M H-16-44 data sheet on The Diesel Shop.

Railroad/Company: Fairbanks Morse and Company was an American manufacturing company in the late 19th and early 20th century. Originally a weighing scale manufacturer, it later diversified into pumps, engines, windmills, coffee grinders, farm tractors, feed mills, locomotives and industrial supplies until it was merged in 1958. It used the trade name Fairbanks-Morse.
Fairbanks Morse and Company merged with Penn-Texas Corporation in 1958 to form Fairbanks Whitney Corporation. One of the successors of the original company is Fairbanks Morse Engine, a subsidiary of EnPro Industries, that continues to develop and sell opposed piston (OP) engine technology for marine applications.

Fairbanks Morse was the last builder to enter the diesel locomotive market in 1939 and the first to exit in 1958. While its opposed-piston engine design was not as successful in locomotive application as with marine ships its locomotives were nevertheless revolutionary for their time, so revolutionary that it would take twenty years after the builder’s exit from the market for railroads to become interested in similar models!

From Wikipedia
Read more on American-Rail.com


Item Links: We found: 1 different collections associated with Rail - Locomotive - Diesel - Fairbanks Morse H-16-44
Item created by: Alain LM on 2018-08-19 03:57:08. Last edited by Alain LM on 2018-08-19 05:27:06

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.