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N Scale - Life-Like - 7755 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 - Burlington Northern - 9790

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One of these sold for: $15.00

N Scale - Life-Like - 7755 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 - Burlington Northern - 9790 Copyright held by TroveStar


N Scale - Life-Like - 7755 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 - Burlington Northern - 9790


Production Type Regular Production
Stock Number 7755
Brand Life-Like
Manufacturer Life-Like
Body Style Life-Like Diesel Engine F-7 A&B Units
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, EMD F7 (Details)
Road or Company Name Burlington Northern (Details)
Reporting Marks BN
Road or Reporting Number 9790
Paint Color(s) Green, White and Silver
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
DCC Readiness No
Announcement Date 1990-01-01
Release Date 1990-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety F7A
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160


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Model Information: This model was introduced by Life-Like in 1990. It is made in China and is an older design.

The model features truck-mounted rapido couplers. The shell design has all details molded in, which makes it durable, but not as elegant as later designs from 2000 on which often feature niceties such as applied grab-irons in similar models. There are no flywheels in the mechanism, but it does feature two lead slugs to give it a nice hefty weight which helps it pull. Pickup is OK but the movement can be a little jerky (did I mention the lack of flywheels?). It is fairly quiet considering the older design and it will pull 30 cars on a flat surface.

The pricing of this model was always aggressive so it can be a staple in many hobbyists collection due to affordability. Since it is not DCC-Friendly, it doesn't carry much current value.

Prototype History: The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's successful line of F unit locomotives, and by far the best-selling cab unit of all time. In fact, more F7's were built than all other F units combined. It succeeded the F3 model in GM-EMD's F unit sequence, and was replaced in turn by the F9. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois, plant or GMD's London, Ontario, facility.

The F7 differed from the F3 primarily in internal equipment (mostly electrical) and some external features. Its continuous tractive effort rating was 20% higher (e.g. 40,000 lb (18,000 kg) for an F7 with 65 mph (105 km/h) gearing, compared to 32,500 lb (14,700 kg) for an F3 with the same gearing.

A total of 2,366 cab-equipped lead A units and 1,483 cabless-booster or B units were built. (Note: the B unit is often referred to as an "F7B", whereas the A unit is simply an "F7".)

Many F7s remained in service for decades, as railroads found them economical to operate and maintain. However, the locomotive was not very popular with yard crews who operated them in switching service because they were difficult to mount and dismount, and it was also nearly impossible for the engineer to see hand signals from a ground crew without leaning way outside the window. As most of these engines were bought and operated before two-way radio became standard on most American railroads, this was a major point of contention. In later years, with the advent of the "road switchers" such as the EMD GP7, F units were primarily used in "through freight" and "unit train" service where there was very little or no switching to be done on line of road.

From Wikipedia
Read more on American-Rails.com

Road Name History: The Burlington Northern Railroad (reporting mark BN) was a United States railroad. It was a product of a March 2, 1970, merger of four major railroads - the Great Northern Railway, Northern Pacific Railway, Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway and the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad - as well as a few small jointly owned subsidiaries owned by the four.

Burlington Northern operated between 1970 and 1996.

Its historical lineage begins in the earliest days of railroading with the chartering in 1848 of the Chicago and Aurora Railroad, a direct ancestor line of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, which lends Burlington to the names of various merger-produced successors.

Burlington Northern purchased the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway on December 31, 1996 to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway (later renamed BNSF Railway), which was owned by the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corporation.*

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information: Life-Like Products LLC (now Life-Like Toy and Hobby division of Wm. K. Walthers) was a manufacturer of model railroad products and was based in Baltimore, Maryland.

It was founded in the 1950s by a company that pioneered extruded foam ice chests under the Lifoam trademark. Because ice chests are a summer seasonal item, the company needed a way to keep the factory operating year round. As model railroading was becoming popular in the post-war years, they saw this as an opportunity and so manufactured extruded foam tunnels for model trains. Over the years, Life-Like expanded into other scenery items, finally manufacturing rolling stock beginning in the late 1960s. At some point in the early 1970s, Life-Like purchased Varney Inc. and began to produce the former Varney line as its own.

The Canadian distributor for Life-Like products, Canadian Hobbycraft, saw a missing segment in market for Canadian model prototypes, and started producing a few Canadian models that were later, with a few modifications, offered in the US market with US roadnames.

In 2005, the company, now known as Lifoam Industries, LLC, decided to concentrate on their core products of extruded foam and sold their model railroad operations to Wm. K. Walthers.

In June 2018, Atlas and Walthers announced to have reached an agreement under which all Walthers N scale rolling stock tooling, including the former Life-Like tooling, will be purchased by Atlas.

Read more on Wikipedia and The Train Collectors Association.


Item created by: bluedragon0 on 2017-12-23 23:33:17. Last edited by Alain LM on 2018-04-19 17:34:06

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