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N Scale - Life-Like - 44265 - Engine, Diesel, C-424 - Canadian National - 3208

Original Rapido couplers replaced by MTL Magne-Matic knuckle


with original Rapido couplers


Brand Life-Like
Stock Number 44265
Original Retail Price C$139.95
Manufacturer Hobbycraft Canada
Body Style Life-Like Diesel Engine C-424/C-425
Road/Company Name Canadian National
Reporting Marks CN
Road/Reporting Number 3208
Paint Color(s) Red nose, Black and White stripes
Paint Scheme Sergeant Stripes
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 2004-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Alco/MLW
Model Variety C-424
Prototype Engine, Diesel, C-424
Region North America


Body Style Information: The initial 2002 run of this model was produced by "Life-Like Canada". This release was limited to 180 units produced in each of 5 different Canadian paint schemes. In 2003, a more widespread release was issued by "normal" Life-Like. A second release was issued in 2004.

The mechanism sports most of the features one normally associates with "modern" diesel models - IE, split-frame / all-metal chassis, 5-pole / skew-wound "scale speed" motor with dual flywheels, low-friction drive, bi-directional LED lighting, all-wheel drive and pickup (no traction tires), blackened / low-profile wheels, shell-mounted couplers (Rapidos, though), all-plastic gearing, etc.

For a more in-depth review, please visit: spookshow.net

Assembly instructions of this model on HOseeker.net for the US version and here for the Canadian version.

DCC Information: Unfortunately, there is no support for DCC whatsoever.

A wired DCC decoder installation for this model can be found on Brad Myers' N-scale DCC decoder installs blog or on David Harris's Web Page.

Also watch this video "N scale C424 diesel Life Like TCS M1 DCC decoder installation by AK Crazy Russian with DCCTRAIN":


Prototype Information: The ALCO Century 424 was a four-axle, 2,400 hp (1,790 kW) diesel-electric locomotive of the road switcher type. 190 were built between April 1963 and May 1967. Cataloged as a part of Alco's Century line of locomotives, the C424 was intended to replace the earlier RS-27 model and offered as a lower-priced alternative to the C425. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

Montreal Locomotive Works also built this locomotive as MLW Century 424 for Canadian railroads. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

The ALCO Century 425 was a four-axle, 2,500 hp (1,860 kW) diesel-electric locomotive of the road switcher type. 91 were built between October 1964 and December 1966. Cataloged as part of ALCO's "Century" line of locomotives, the C425 was an upgraded version of the C424. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Road/Company Information:
The Canadian National Railway Company (reporting mark CN) is a Canadian Class I railway headquartered in Montreal, Quebec that serves Canada and the Midwestern and Southern United States. CN's slogan is "North America's Railroad". CN is a public company with 24,000 employees. It had a market capitalization of 32 billion CAD in 2011. CN was government-owned, having been a Canadian Crown corporation from its founding to its privatization in 1995. Bill Gates was, in 2011, the largest single shareholder of CN stock.

CN is the largest railway in Canada, in terms of both revenue and the physical size of its rail network, and is currently Canada's only transcontinental railway company, spanning Canada from the Atlantic coast in Nova Scotia to the Pacific coast in British Columbia. Its range once reached across the island of Newfoundland until 1988, when the Newfoundland Railway was abandoned.

Following CN's purchase of Illinois Central (IC) and a number of smaller US railways, it also has extensive trackage in the central United States along the Mississippi River valley from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico. Today, CN owns about 20,400 route miles (32,831 km) of track in 8 provinces (the only two not served by CN are Newfoundland & Labrador and Prince Edward Island), as well as a 70-mile (113 km) stretch of track (see Mackenzie Northern Railway) into the Northwest Territories to Hay River on the southern shore of Great Slave Lake; it is the northernmost rail line anywhere within the North American Rail Network, as far north as Anchorage, Alaska (although the Alaska Railroad goes further north than this, it is isolated from the rest of the rail network).

The railway was referred to as the Canadian National Railways (CNR) between 1918 and 1960, and as Canadian National/Canadien National (CN) from 1960 to the present.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Life-Like Products LLC (now Life-Like Toy and Hobby division of Wm. K. Walthers) was a manufacturer of model railroad products and was based in Baltimore, Maryland.

It was founded in the 1950s by a company that pioneered extruded foam ice chests under the Lifoam trademark. Because ice chests are a summer seasonal item, the company needed a way to keep the factory operating year round. As model railroading was becoming popular in the post-war years, they saw this as an opportunity and so manufactured extruded foam tunnels for model trains. Over the years, Life-Like expanded into other scenery items, finally manufacturing rolling stock beginning in the late 1960s. At some point in the early 1970s, Life-Like purchased Varney Inc. and began to produce the former Varney line as its own.

The Canadian distributor for Life-Like products, Canadian Hobbycraft, saw a missing segment in market for Canadian model prototypes, and started producing a few Canadian models that were later, with a few modifications, offered in the US market with US roadnames.

In 2005, the company, now known as Lifoam Industries, LLC, decided to concentrate on their core products of extruded foam and sold their model railroad operations to Wm. K. Walthers.

Read more on Wikipedia and The Train Collectors Association.


Item created by: AlanUS on 2016-08-06 03:38:20. Last edited by AlanUS on 2016-08-15 15:15:03

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