Search:
Type the text to search here and press Enter.
Separate search terms by a space; they will all be searched individually in all fields of the database.

Click on Search: to go to the advanced search page.

N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-202042 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco PA/PB - Santa Fe - 54

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-202042 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco PA/PB - Santa Fe - 54 Image Courtesy of Klaus Nahr


N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-202042 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco PA/PB - Santa Fe - 54 Image Courtesy of Klaus Nahr


Stock Number 0001-202042
Original Retail Price $47.98
Brand Con-Cor
Manufacturer Con-Cor
Body Style Con-Cor Diesel Engine PA-1/PB-1
Prototype Vehicle Locomotive, Diesel, Alco PA/PB (Details)
Road or Company Name Santa Fe (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 54
Paint Color(s) Red, Silver, Yellow, Black
Print Color(s) Black, White
Paint Scheme Warbonnet
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
DCC Readiness Dummy Engine
Release Date 2003-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Alco
Model Variety PB-1
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Years Produced 1946-1953
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: This is an unpowered dummy unit.

Model Information: Con-Cor introduced these Kato-made locomotives in the late 1960s. Kato revised the mechanism in 1972 and in 1994 Con-Cor had a new mechanism made for Chinese production. In 2003, the engine was re-tooled again to be DCC-Ready.

2003 release: features of the powered PA-1 Unit.
  • DUAL flywheel drive
  • Comes with factory mounted Genuine Micro-Trains couplers
  • Runs on “DC” right out the box.
  • Factory installed DCC friendly PC 8 pin NMRA board.
  • High Torque / Quiet 5 Pole skewed armature motor
  • Reversing headlight
  • Heavy die-cast chassis for superior pulling power
  • Highly detailed body casting
  • Detailed paint and printing
  • Multi cab numbers available for Powered and non-Powered units
  • Old bodies interchangeable with new units, so it will be easy to upgrade your older Con-Cor N PA-1 units to this new drive if you choose

DCC Information: All versions prior to 2003 are not DCC capable, but 2003 and later are DCC-Ready.

Prototype History:
ALCO PA (DL-304/DL-305) refers to a family of A1A-A1A diesel locomotives built to haul high-speed passenger trains that were built in Schenectady, New York, in the United States by a partnership of the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) and General Electric (GE) between June, 1946 and December, 1953. They were of a cab unit design, and both cab-equipped lead A unit PA and cabless booster B unit PB models were built. ALCO's beautiful PA-1 is one of America's most famous locomotives. It was ALCO's entry into the passenger train diesel craze, competing directly with the E-Units from EMD. The first PA1 celebrated Alco's 75,000th loco to roll out of the erecting shop.

The PAs, as well as their cousins, the ALCO FAs, were born as a result of Alco's development of a new diesel engine design, the Model 244. In early 1944, development started on the new design. In 1946, this new locomotive made its debut on the Texas and New Orleans Railroad. Southern Pacific PA's #6055 and 6056 were later put into service on the SP's coastal division, pulling trains such as the Morning Daylight.
Having more horsepower than their leading competitor, Alco felt that they had a fleet-ready competitive product. PA1's were sleek, stylish, powerful, and were very well suited for America's passenger and fast freight trains. Additionally, their 65' 8" bodies became excellent billboard advertising for the railroads that they served with pride.
The PA-1/PB-1 were rated 2,000 hp (1,490 kW) and the PA-2/PB-2 2,250 hp (1,680 kW). A total of 297 PA/PB have been built between 1946 and 1953.

ALCO locomotives were also used in service with the famous "California Zephyr" passenger train, adopting a number of paint schemes, the most famous of which was perhaps the "Prospector" paint scheme. This paint scheme was a striking two-tone silver and gold arrangement, highlighted by a series of four black stripes going down the side of the body.

Read more on Wikipedia
and on American-Rails.com

Road Name History:
The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway (reporting mark ATSF), often abbreviated as Santa Fe or AT&SF, was one of the larger railroads in the United States. Chartered in February 1859, the railroad reached the Kansas-Colorado border in 1873 and Pueblo, Colorado, in 1876. To create a demand for its services, the railroad set up real estate offices and sold farm land from the land grants that it was awarded by Congress. Despite the name, its main line never served Santa Fe, New Mexico, as the terrain was too difficult; the town ultimately was reached by a branch line from Lamy.

The Santa Fe was a pioneer in intermodal freight transport, an enterprise that (at one time or another) included a tugboat fleet and an airline (the short-lived Santa Fe Skyway). Its bus line extended passenger transportation to areas not accessible by rail, and ferryboats on the San Francisco Bay allowed travelers to complete their westward journeys to the Pacific Ocean. The ATSF was the subject of a popular song, Harry Warren & Johnny Mercer's "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe", written for the film, The Harvey Girls (1946).

The railroad officially ceased operations on December 31, 1996, when it merged with the Burlington Northern Railroad to form the Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Paint Scheme:
While there were many, now-classic paint schemes to grace locomotives during the start of the diesel and streamliner age of the 1930s none became as legendary as Santa Fe's "Warbonnet" (and most did not even receive a formal name). The design was the creation of artist Leland A. Knickerbocker, who worked for General Motors. During the mid-1930s the company needed a classy, matching livery to the Native-American themed train that the Santa Fe was planning to debut. Of course, you probably know the name of this train, the Super Chief, which went on to become just as famous as the paint it wore.

The Warbonnet was shelved by the railroad following the end of passenger service in 1971 but was readopted in the late 1980s. Following the creation of Burlington Northern Santa Fe in 1995 a version of the livery was briefly used but was finally dropped altogether.

From AmericaRails.com

Brand/Importer Information:
Con-Cor has been in business since 1962. Many things have changed over time as originally they were a complete manufacturing operation in the USA and at one time had upwards of 45 employees. They not only designed the models,but they also built their own molds, did injection molding, painting, printing and packaging on their models.

Currently, most of their manufacturing has been moved overseas and now they import 90% of their products as totally finished goods, or in finished components. They only do some incidental manufacturing today within the USA.

Important Note: The Con-Cor product numbering can be very confusing. Please see here in the article how to properly enter Con-Cor stock numbers in the TroveStar database.

Item created by: klausnahr on 2020-08-09 15:35:28. Last edited by klausnahr on 2021-05-09 05:03:25

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.