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N Scale - InterMountain - 67105-33 - Gondola, Bathtub, Bethgon Coalporter - Canadian Pacific - 350812

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N Scale - InterMountain - 67105-33 - Gondola, Bathtub, Bethgon Coalporter - Canadian Pacific - 350812 Image Courtesy of InterMountain Railway
Road/Reporting Number does not match. Image otherwise accurate.


Brand InterMountain
Stock Number 67105-33
Manufacturer InterMountain Railway
Production Type Regular Production
Image Provider's Website Link
Body Style Intermountain Gondola Bathtub
Prototype Gondola, Bathtub, Bethgon Coalporter (Details)
Road or Company Name Canadian Pacific (Details)
Reporting Marks CP
Road or Reporting Number 350812
Paint Color(s) Black, White
Print Color(s) White
Paint Scheme White Stripe
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Plastic
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Gondola
Model Subtype Bathtub
Model Variety Bethgon Coalporter
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era V: Modern (1979 - Present)
Scale 1/160



Specific Item Information: Built: 11-88 This N scale Bathtub Coal Gondola is painted black with the CP RAIL logo in white. There is a white vertical stripe at one end. The model includes a car load. The car is equipped with Micro-Trains® trucks and couplers.

Model Information: This Intermountain model features some excellent detail work. Of particular note is the handrails at each car end, brake details, and grab irons. The underframes don't have much detail but we suspect that this is true of the prototype as well. Some of the brake components seem to be molded on whereas other parts are separately applied details. Overall the car ends are the highlight of this model. Being an older model, the couplers are truck mounted and plastic wheels are present on the trucks. That being said, InterMountain used MTL Barber truck/couplers and the result is a car that tracks and runs very well. Now, it is possible to swap the wheels with nicely made blackened wheels supplied by Fox Valley, InterMountain and (coming later in 2017) MTL OEM wheels.

On the negative side, the factory-supplied plastic coal loads are a total write-off and should be swapped at your earliest convenience with a Hay Brothers (or equivalent) resin cast load. Please look at item for an example of one of these cars with a Hay Brothers Load

Prototype History:
Since 1982, the BethGon Coalporter has been hauling "black diamonds" across the United States. The largest selling Coal Gondola in the world, the car's double tub design increases hauling capacity while reducing maintenance requirements. Tubs below the car lower the center of gravity, providing a smoother ride.

Today, coal is no longer sold at the volume it once was in the United States, and many coal carrying railroad cars have sadly been left to rust. Bethgon Coalporters could transport 44,000 pounds of these “black diamonds,” a necessity for the railroad in the era of a coal-driven country; therefore, a need of recycling these cars had to be found!

Since the use of grain for animal feed is popular for farmers in the western part of the United States, Bethgons proved up for the challenge and some were converted for use as a Protein Gondola. These covered gondolas are used in freight trains in the western and southern parts of the states in long, endless fleets providing useful feed for farm animals. Since the load of feed is biodegradable and therefore needs to be delivered as quickly as possible, trains carrying these long loads are given top priority on the rails.

Road Name History:
The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR), formerly also known as CP Rail (reporting mark CP) between 1968 and 1996, is a historic Canadian Class I railroad incorporated in 1881. The railroad is owned by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited (TSX: CP, NYSE: CP), which began operations as legal owner in a corporate restructuring in 2001.

Headquartered in Calgary, Alberta, it owns approximately 23,000 kilometres (14,000 mi) of track all across Canada and into the United States, stretching from Montreal to Vancouver, and as far north as Edmonton. Its rail network also serves major cities in the United States, such as Minneapolis, Milwaukee, Detroit, Chicago, and New York City.

The railway was originally built between Eastern Canada and British Columbia between 1881 and 1885 (connecting with Ottawa Valley and Georgian Bay area lines built earlier), fulfilling a promise extended to British Columbia when it entered Confederation in 1871. It was Canada's first transcontinental railway, but currently does not reach the Atlantic coast. Primarily a freight railway, the CPR was for decades the only practical means of long-distance passenger transport in most regions of Canada, and was instrumental in the settlement and development of Western Canada. The CP became one of the largest and most powerful companies in Canada, a position it held as late as 1975. Its primary passenger services were eliminated in 1986, after being assumed by Via Rail Canada in 1978. A beaver was chosen as the railway's logo because it is the national symbol of Canada and was seen as representing the hardworking character of the company.

The company acquired two American lines in 2009: the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad and the Iowa, Chicago and Eastern Railroad. The trackage of the ICE was at one time part of CP subsidiary Soo Line and predecessor line The Milwaukee Road. The combined DME/ICE system spanned North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Nebraska and Iowa, as well as two short stretches into two other states, which included a line to Kansas City, Missouri, and a line to Chicago, Illinois, and regulatory approval to build a line into the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. It is publicly traded on both the Toronto Stock Exchange and the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker CP. Its U.S. headquarters are in Minneapolis.

After close of markets on November 17, 2015, CP announced an offer to purchase all outstanding shares of Norfolk Southern Railway, at a price in excess of the US$26 billion capitalization of the United States-based railway. If completed, this merger of the second and fourth oldest Class I railroads in North America would have formed the largest single railway company on that continent, reaching from the Pacific coast to the Atlantic coast to the Gulf Coast. The merger effort was abandoned by Canadian Pacific on April 11, 2016, after three offers were rejected by the Norfolk Southern board.

Read more on Wikipedia and on Canadian Pacific official website.

Brand/Importer Information:
InterMountain was founded in 1985 by Fred Brummet. They got started in the model railroad business by producing O-Scale model kits. They got started in the N Scale business almost a decade later when in 1994 they introduced the 40-23 reefer car in kit form. Later, in 1998, they started producing RTR (Ready-to-Run) models. By the early 2000s, InterMountain phased out kit production in favor of the RTR models.

The InterMountain Railway company is located at 1224 Boston Ave in Longmont, CO. They are a manufacturer of HO, N and Z scale model trains. They have produced kits as well as RTR (Ready-To-Run) models. Their N Scale products include locomotives as well as rolling stock. Their rolling stock lineup includes Boxcars, Hoppers, Tank Cars, Reefers, Gondolas, Stock Cars and Flatcars.

Their locomotive releases have primarily been diesel units, with the one major exception being their series of AC-12 Cab Forward steam locos. Their diesel lineup includes F3's, F7's, F9's, SD40's, SD45's and FT units. They are known for quality and detail. They also release their rolling stock in larger varieties of road numbers than most of the other manufacturers.

Item created by: petecduffy on 2019-03-14 15:01:29

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