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N Scale - Roundhouse - 8567 - Passenger Car, Early, Overton - Virginia & Truckee - 215

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N Scale - Roundhouse - 8567 - Passenger Car, Early, Overton - Virginia & Truckee - 215 The image shown is the same body type though not necessarily the same road name or road number.



Brand Roundhouse
Stock Number 8567
Manufacturer MDC Roundhouse
Body Style MDC Passenger Car 34 Foot Overton Baggage
Prototype Passenger Car, Early, Overton (Details)
Road or Company Name Virginia & Truckee (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 215
Paint Color(s) Orange
Release Date 2000-08-01
Item Category Passenger Cars
Model Type Early
Model Subtype Overton
Model Variety 34 Foot Baggage Car
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era I: Early Steam (1835 - 1900)
Scale 1/160



Prototype History:
The Sierra Railway contracted with the Overton company to produce combine and coach sets used only on the Angels Camp branch where the short switchback tails limited the car length. 2-3 sets of the cars were built, in the early 1900s. Overton passenger cars are short, open platform, truss-rod cars with clerestory windows. It was natural to design the clerestory over the passenger compartment only, without continuing it over the end platforms, as there was no need for light and ventilation on the open platforms; however, it was soon found to be easier to build a full length clerestory without a complex joint at the ends. The clerestory actually weakened the structure of the car, as well as adding top-weight and cost. As far as we can tell, 'Overton' has become a sort-of generic term for early passenger cars with the above features.

Road Name History:
The Virginia and Truckee Railroad (reporting mark VT) was built to serve the Comstock Lode mining communities of northwestern Nevada. At its height, the railroad's route ran from Reno south to Carson City, Nevada. In Carson City, the mainline split into two branches. One branch continued south to Minden, while the other branch traveled east to Virginia City. The first section from Virginia City to Carson City was constructed beginning in 1869 to haul ore, lumber and supplies for the Comstock Lode.

The railroad was abandoned in 1950 after years of declining revenue. Much of the rail infrastructure was pulled up and sold, along with the remaining locomotives and railcars. In the 1970s, with public interest in historic railroads on the rise, the old lines were rebuilt by private investors, with an eye towards re-opening the lines.

Today, the privately owned Virginia and Truckee Railroad Company operates as a heritage railroad, headquartered in Virginia City. The present route is 14.1 miles (22.7 km) long. The railroad owns and uses the service mark "Queen of the Short Lines". The V&T Railroad runs up to seven trains per day, many in steam behind locomotive #29, a 2-8-0 Consolidation, or an ex-US Army GE 80-ton diesel from Virginia City from Memorial Day until the end of October each year.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
MDC Roundhouse was founded in California in 1938 and relocated in 1993 to Carson City, Nevada due to statewide restrictions on painting. MDC Roundhouse was a producer of both RTR (Ready-to-Run) and kit versions of N Scale rolling stock as well as RTR locomotives. They entered the N scale market in 1979 with a Thrall Hi-Side Gondola and a Hi-Cube Single Door Box Car. MDC Roundhouse was purchased by Horizon Hobbies in June of 2004, when its owner since 1938 C. H. Menteer retired, and merged into their Athearn line.

Unlike many of their contemporaries which contracted with European firms to produce their products, MDC made their own toolings. They made several popular body styles and produced them for road names that many other vendors (even Micro-Trains) wouldn't touch. This made them popular with modelers. Also, their un-assembled "kits" permitted a lower price point so they were popular with "runners" as well as "modelers".

Of particular interest was the attention given to modern 50 foot steel boxcars. They made some attempt to accurately mold the differences into distinct models to represent each of the major prototype manufacturers products. They have distinct toolings not only for the different products from FMC, BFF and PS, but also multiple models for each of these manufacturers including "standard" vs "Youngstown" doors and "waffle" vs. "rib" sides. In total they produced 13 different versions of the 50 foot steel boxcar.

Item created by: gdm on 2017-12-04 17:57:35. Last edited by gdm on 2018-04-19 07:36:33

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