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N Scale - Atlas - 46170 - Engine, Diesel, GP35 - Ann Arbor - 385

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N Scale - Atlas - 46170 - Engine, Diesel, GP35 - Ann Arbor - 385


N Scale - Atlas - 46170 - Engine, Diesel, GP35 - Ann Arbor - 385 An image of the prototype.


Brand Atlas
Stock Number 46170
Original Retail Price $154.95
Manufacturer Atlas
Image Credit Link
Body Style Atlas Diesel Engine GP35
Road or Company Name Ann Arbor (Details)
Reporting Marks AAR
Road or Reporting Number 385
Paint Color(s) Orange / Black
Body Construction Plastic
DCC Readiness DC/DCC Dual Mode Decoder
Release Date 2009-06-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety GP35
Prototype Engine, Diesel, GP35
Region North America
Era/Epoch Era IV: 1958 - 1978


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Body Style Information: This model was first released by Atlas in 1992. The GP35 model shares the same mechanism as the GP30 model from Atlas. The early version of the GP35 was produced for Atlas by Kato in Japan. The tooling was moved to China in 1997 as the "Atlas Classic" version. It was later retooled in 2006 to support a drop in decoder.

The Kato and early Chinese models are a typical "2nd generation" semi-modern design with flywheels and a split-frame design but no support for drop-in decoders. The 2006+ models are fully modern (3rd generation) engines with drop-in decoder capability.

DCC Information: The Kato and early Chinese "Classic" models are Friendly, and the late Chinese models are DCC-Ready and accept a 1.5 Amp N Scale Board Replacement Mobile Decoder for Atlas GP30 (DN163A4) from digitrax.com.

Prototype Information: The EMD GP35 is a 4-axle diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division between July 1963 and December 1965 and by General Motors Diesel between May 1964 and January 1966. The locomotive's power was provided by an EMD 567D3A 16-cylinder engine which generated 2,500 horsepower (1,860 kW).

Many railroads traded in Alco and EMD F units for GP35s, reusing the trucks and traction motors. Some railroads had EMD reuse the Alco trucks on the GP35s. Notable examples include the Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad, Southern Railway, and the Ann Arbor Railroad.

1251 examples of this locomotive model were built for American railroads, 26 were built for Canadian railroads and 57 were built for Mexican railroads.

From Wikipedia

Road/Company Information:
The Ann Arbor Railroad (reporting mark AA) was an American railroad that operated between Toledo, Ohio and Elberta and Frankfort, Michigan (about 294 route miles) with train ferry operations across Lake Michigan. In 1967 it reported 572 million net ton-miles of revenue freight, including 107 million in "lake transfer service"; that total does not include the 39-mile subsidiary Manistique and Lake Superior Railroad.

The railroad company was chartered September 21, 1895 as successor to the Toledo, Ann Arbor and North Michigan Railway. In 1905 it was acquired by the Detroit, Toledo & Ironton Railway (DT&I), which went bankrupt three years later and had to sell off the Ann Arbor.

For many years the Ann Arbor was owned by the Wabash, but Wabash gave up control in 1963 as part of its absorption into the Norfolk and Western. The DT&I, by then itself owned by the giant Pennsylvania Railroad, again gained control in 1963. The combined DT&I and AA were operated as independent subsidiaries of the PRR but suffered from the parent company's ill-fated 1968 merger with the New York Central. Upon the resulting Penn Central's 1970 bankruptcy, the DT&I and its Ann Arbor subsidiary were sold off to private investors.

The Ann Arbor Railroad owned a subsidiary, the Manistique and Lake Superior Railroad (M&LS), from somewhere shortly after that line's origin in 1909 until it was abandoned in 1968.

After itself going bankrupt in 1973 the Ann Arbor ceased operations as a railroad on April 1, 1976, when the Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) temporarily took over. Since Conrail only wished to operate the south end of the AA, the state of Michigan acquired the entire line, and operations were transferred to the Michigan Interstate Railway, a division of the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT), on October 1, 1977. The state eventually privatized this entity, selling it off in pieces to several different short-line railroad companies.

On October 7, 1988 a new Ann Arbor Railroad began operating the portion south of Ann Arbor; the Great Lakes Central Railroad now serves the remaining portions of the line. Some sections have been abandoned: from Yuma to Elberta and Frankfort (approximately 45 miles), about 10 miles in Shiawassee County, Michigan (in three discontinuous sections), and the trackage around the now-demolished Cherry Street Station in Toledo.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
In 1924 Stephan Schaffan, Sr. founded the Atlas Tool Company in Newark, New Jersey. In 1933 his son, Stephan Schaffan, Jr., came to work for his father at the age of sixteen. Steve Jr. built model airplanes as a hobby and frequented a local hobby shop. Being an enterprising young man, he would often ask the owner if there was anything he could do to earn some extra spending money. Tired of listening to his requests, the hobby-store owner threw some model railroad track parts his way and said, "Here, see if you can improve on this".

In those days, railroad modelers had to assemble and build everything from scratch. Steve Jr. created a "switch kit" which sold so well, that the entire family worked on them in the basement at night, while doing business as usual in the machine shop during the day.

Subsequently, Steve Jr. engineered the stapling of rail to fiber track, along with inventing the first practical rail joiner and pre-assembled turnouts and flexible track. All of these products, and more, helped to popularize model railroading and assisted in the creation of a mass-market hobby. The budding entrepreneur quickly outgrew the limitations of a basement and small garage operation. Realizing they could actually make a living selling track and related products, Steve and his father had the first factory built in Hillside, New Jersey at 413 Florence Avenue in 1947. On September 30, 1949, the Atlas Tool Company was officially incorporated as a New Jersey company.

In 1985, Steve was honored posthumously for his inventions by the Model Railroad Industry Association and was inducted into the Model Railroad Industry Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition, Steve was nominated and entered into the National Model Railroad Association Pioneers of Model Railroading in 1995.

In the early 1990s, the Atlas Tool Company changed its name to Atlas Model Railroad Company, Inc.


Item created by: Steve German on 2016-04-20 19:49:22

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