Search : Mkt:

N Scale - Atlas - 42632 - Engine, Diesel, RS-11 - Louisville & Nashville - 959

Please help keep TroveStar ad-free. Why?

2 of these sold for an average price of: $84.98

N Scale - Atlas - 42632 - Engine, Diesel, RS-11 - Louisville & Nashville - 959


Brand Atlas
Stock Number 42632
Original Retail Price $99.95
Manufacturer Atlas
Body Style Atlas Diesel Road Switcher RS-11
Road or Company Name Louisville & Nashville (Details)
Reporting Marks L&N
Road or Reporting Number 959
Paint Color(s) Grey/Yellow
DCC Readiness Ready
Release Date 2006-10-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Alco
Model Variety RS-11
Prototype Engine, Diesel, RS-11
Prototype Manufacturer Name Alco
Prototype Model Name RS-11
Prototype Year(s) of Production 1956-1961
Region North America
Era/Epoch All Eras


People who viewed this item also viewed: 105499, 87866, 88043, 88293, 88321

Body Style Information: Atlas introduced this model in 1986. It was originally produced by Kato for Atlas under contract. The Kato version shares a chassis with Kato's RS-3 model but some of the internal components differ, primarily in the worm assembly. Atlas ceased importing this model in the 1990s and later, in 2006, designed their own version which was produced in China. This new version (2006+) is properly DCC-Ready and accepts a drop-in decoder. It also features a skew-wound motor with all eight wheels involved with electrical pickup and drive (no traction tires). The Chinese version features body-mounted AccuMate couplers whereas the Kato version have truck-mounted couplers. This version also has Golden White LEDs, separated handrails and side sill and a prototypical wheelbase. The Kato wheelbase is off due to the common chassis shared with the RS-3.

See a video of these engines on our YouTube Channel

DCC Information: Models produced from 2006 are DCC Ready or Dual-Model Decoder Equipped. They accept the following drop-in decoders:
- Digitrax DN163A0: 1 Amp N Scale Mobile Decoder for Atlas N-Scale GP40-2, U25B, SD35, Trainmaster, B23-7 and others
- TCS AMD4 (Installation for Atlas RS-11)
- NCE N12A0: Plug and play decoder for N-Scale Atlas GP40-2, U25B, U23B, B23-7, 30-7, 36-7, GP38, SD25, TRAINMASTER, etc.
- MRC 1812: N-Scale Sound Decoder for most Atlas short/medium 4-axle locos (selection of 4 prime movers - might not be prototypical for this model however)

Earlier DCC factory-equipped versions were fitted with Lenz LE063XF decoders, whereas most recent versions are fitted with NCE N12A0 decoders. The Atlas version of these decoders will respond to manufacturer's address "127" (CV8) i.e. "Atlas Model Railroad Products", though being identical to their original manufacturer's specification.

Prototype Information: The first RS-11s were produced by Alco in early 1956. This locomotive, classified by Alco as model DL-701, was their replacement for the very popular RS-3 road-switcher. Featuring a V-12, 1,800hp 251B diesel engine, the RS-11 was Alco's answer to EMD's very successful GP9. The turbocharged RS-11 accelerated faster, had a higher tractive effort rating and typically used less fuel than the competition. It was also quite versatile and could be found in heavy haul freight as well as passenger service.

The largest owner of RS-11s was Norfolk & Western which purchased a total of 99 units (an additional 35 were added to the fleet after the merger with Nickel Plate). Other major purchasers included Northern Pacific, Pennsylvania and Southern Pacific, all of whom placed repeat orders. With approximately 426 units built for the US and Mexico over 8 years of production, the RS-11 was successful for Alco in that it provided ongoing competition for EMD's popular road-switchers. A few examples of this model are still in service today and can be found working for various shortlines in the US.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Road/Company Information:
The Louisville and Nashville Railroad (reporting mark LN), commonly called the L&N, was a Class I railroad that operated freight and passenger services in the southeast United States.

Chartered by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1850, the road grew into one of the great success stories of American business. Operating under one name continuously for 132 years, it survived civil war and economic depression and several waves of social and technological change. Under Milton H. Smith, president of the company for thirty years, the L&N grew from a road with less than three hundred miles (480 km) of track to a 6,000-mile (9,700 km) system serving thirteen states. As one of the premier Southern railroads, the L&N extended its reach far beyond its namesake cities, stretching to St. Louis, Memphis, Atlanta, and New Orleans. The railroad was economically strong throughout its lifetime, operating both freight and passenger trains in a manner that earned it the nickname, "The Old Reliable."

Growth of the railroad continued until its purchase and the tumultuous rail consolidations of the 1980s which led to continual successors. By the end of 1970, L&N operated 6,063 miles (9,757 km) of road on 10,051 miles (16,176 km) of track, not including the Carrollton Railroad.

In 1971 the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad, successor to the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, purchased the remainder of the L&N shares it did not already own, and the company became a subsidiary. By 1982 the railroad industry was consolidating quickly, and the Seaboard Coast Line absorbed the Louisville & Nashville Railroad entirely. Then in 1986, the Seaboard System merged with the C&O and B&O and the new combined system was known as the Chessie System. Soon after the combined company became CSX Transportation (CSX), which now owns and operates all of the former Louisville and Nashville lines.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
In 1924 Stephan Schaffan, Sr. founded the Atlas Tool Company in Newark, New Jersey. In 1933 his son, Stephan Schaffan, Jr., came to work for his father at the age of sixteen. Steve Jr. built model airplanes as a hobby and frequented a local hobby shop. Being an enterprising young man, he would often ask the owner if there was anything he could do to earn some extra spending money. Tired of listening to his requests, the hobby-store owner threw some model railroad track parts his way and said, "Here, see if you can improve on this".

In those days, railroad modelers had to assemble and build everything from scratch. Steve Jr. created a "switch kit" which sold so well, that the entire family worked on them in the basement at night, while doing business as usual in the machine shop during the day.

Subsequently, Steve Jr. engineered the stapling of rail to fiber track, along with inventing the first practical rail joiner and pre-assembled turnouts and flexible track. All of these products, and more, helped to popularize model railroading and assisted in the creation of a mass-market hobby. The budding entrepreneur quickly outgrew the limitations of a basement and small garage operation. Realizing they could actually make a living selling track and related products, Steve and his father had the first factory built in Hillside, New Jersey at 413 Florence Avenue in 1947. On September 30, 1949, the Atlas Tool Company was officially incorporated as a New Jersey company.

In 1985, Steve was honored posthumously for his inventions by the Model Railroad Industry Association and was inducted into the Model Railroad Industry Hall of Fame in Baltimore, Maryland. In addition, Steve was nominated and entered into the National Model Railroad Association Pioneers of Model Railroading in 1995.

In the early 1990s, the Atlas Tool Company changed its name to Atlas Model Railroad Company, Inc.


Item created by: Lethe on 2016-03-03 12:25:32. Last edited by Dora on 2016-04-04 15:04:50

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.