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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-01261Q - Caboose, Cupola, MI - Frisco - 1409

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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-01261Q - Caboose, Cupola, MI - Frisco - 1409


Brand Con-Cor
Stock Number 0001-01261Q
Manufacturer Con-Cor
Production Type Regular Production
Body Style Con-Cor Caboose Cupola Extended Vision
Prototype Caboose, Cupola, MI (Details)
Road or Company Name Frisco (Details)
Reporting Marks SLSF
Road or Reporting Number 1409
Paint Color(s) Grey
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Wheel Type Injection Molded Plastic
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Caboose
Model Subtype Cupola
Model Variety Extended Vision
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160



Model Information: This model came out some time around 1983. It re-used the underframe from the earlier Kato-made bay window caboose and hence is stamped "Sekisui Japan" on the bottom. Despite this stamping, these models were assembled in Con-Cor's Chicago factory. Just like the bay-window models, these feature body-mount Rapido couplers. The model is loosely based on the Morrison International (MI) cupola caboose prototype and features an extra-wide "extended vision" cupola.

Prototype History:
This caboose was designed by the Morrison International shop in Kenton, Ohio. Because of the great variety of equipment needs between railroads in the 1950's, International developed the idea of a "modular" caboose design. This conceptual design essentially broke the caboose down on paper into different types or styles that could be built to meet the specific needs of a particular railroad. Rather than trying to force a rigid, fixed design on all the railroads, International felt it better to let the railroad select the pieces to build the caboose to their own liking.


Road Name History:
The St. Louis - San Francisco Railway (reporting mark SLSF), also known as the Frisco, was a railroad that operated in the Midwest and South Central U.S. from 1876 to April 17, 1980. At the end of 1970 it operated 4,547 miles (7,318 km) of road on 6,574 miles (10,580 km) miles of track, not including subsidiaries Quanah, Acme and Pacific Railway or the Alabama, Tennessee and Northern Railroad; that year it reported 12,795 million ton-miles of revenue freight and no passengers. It was purchased and absorbed into the Burlington Northern Railroad in 1980.

The St. Louis - San Francisco Railway was incorporated in Missouri on September 7, 1876. It was formed from the Missouri Division and Central Division of the Atlantic and Pacific Railroad. This land grant line was one of two railroads (the other being the M-K-T) authorized to build across Indian Territory. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad, ATSF, interested in the A & P right of way across the Mojave Desert to California, took the road over until the larger road went bankrupt in 1893; the receivers retained the western right of way but divested the ATSF of the St. Louis-San Francisco mileage on the great plains. After bankruptcy the Frisco emerged as the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, incorporated on June 29, 1896, which also went bankrupt. On August 24, 1916 the company was reorganized as the St. Louis - San Francisco Railway, though the line never went west of Texas, being more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km) from San Francisco.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
Con-Cor has been in business since 1962. Many things have changed over time as originally they were a complete manufacturing operation in the USA and at one time had upwards of 45 employees. They not only designed the models,but they also built their own molds, did injection molding, painting, printing and packaging on their models.

Currently, most of their manufacturing has been moved overseas and now they import 90% of their products as totally finished goods, or in finished components. They only do some incidental manufacturing today within the USA.


Item created by: Mopjunkie on 2020-03-03 20:15:45. Last edited by Lethe on 2020-05-07 00:00:00

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