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Rail - Locomotive - Steam - 2-6-2 Prairie

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Rail - Locomotive - Steam - 2-6-2 Prairie
Name Locomotive, Steam, 2-6-2 Prairie
Region North America
Category Rail
Type Locomotive
SubType Steam
Variety 2-6-2 Prairie
Manufacturer Various (Details)
Era Era I: Early Steam (1835 - 1900)



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History: Under the Whyte notation for the classification of steam locomotives, 2-6-2 represents the wheel arrangement of two leading wheels, six coupled driving wheels and two trailing wheels. This arrangement is commonly called a Prairie. The majority of American 2-6-2s were tender locomotives, but in Europe tank locomotives, described as 2-6-2T, were more common. The first 2-6-2 tender locomotives for a North American customer were built by Brooks Locomotive Works in 1900 for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad, for use on the Midwestern prairies. The type was thus nicknamed the Prairie in North American practice. This name was often also used for British locomotives with this wheel arrangement. As with the 2-10-2, the major problem with the 2-6-2 is that these engines have a symmetrical wheel layout, with the center of gravity almost over the center driving wheel. The reciprocation rods, when working near the center of gravity, induce severe side-to-side nosing which results in intense instability if unrestrained either by a long wheelbase or by the leading and trailing trucks. Though some engines, like the Chicago and Great Western of 1903, had the connecting rod aligned onto the third driver, most examples were powered via the second driver and were prone to the nosing problem.

From Wikipedia

Railroad/Company: This set of items is comprised of more than one name. Please look at the component items for details on the specific roadnames and/or manufacturers.


Item Links: We found: 1 different collections associated with Rail - Locomotive - Steam - 2-6-2 Prairie
Item created by: gdm on 2018-09-28 20:44:09

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