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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-2866 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD E7 - New York Central

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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-2866 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD E7 - New York Central Image Courtesy Roadrailer


N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-2866 - Locomotive, Diesel, EMD E7 - New York Central Image Courtesy Roadrailer


Production Type Regular Production
Stock Number 0001-2866
Brand Con-Cor
Manufacturer Kato
Body Style Con-Cor Diesel Engine E7
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, EMD E7 (Details)
Road or Company Name New York Central (Details)
Paint Color(s) Two Tone Gray
Print Color(s) White
Paint Scheme Lightning Stripe
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype EMD
Model Variety E7A&B
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Years Produced 1945–1949
Scale 1/160


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Specific Item Information: Dummy Unit

Model Information: This is a bit of an oddball. The first version used a Rivarossi made shell on a Rivarossi mechanism. Later versions recycled the Roco mechanism from the E7 using the Rivarossi shell. You can tell the difference based on whether the mechanism says "Italy" or "Austria" on the bottom. Atlas first released this model in 1967. The locomotives were made by Rivarossi which later released them under its own name. The model serves both the E-8 as well as the E-9 prototypes because the two locomotives are superficially identical. The original Rivarossi mechanism apparently is a bit of a dog, and that is likely why Atlas replaced it with the Austrian mechanism in their later releases. The models with a Roco mechanism, however, run pretty darn well and are not too loud despite the antique gearing. They pickup and drive on both trucks.

The original Italian mechanism models were made between 1967 and 1969 and appeared in Atlas Catalogs as late as 1973. They appear in various train sets form Atlas as well as being sold individually. The same shell has also been used by Con-Cor with a Kato-made mechanism.

DCC Information: Neither the Roco nor the Rivarossi mechanism is DCC compatible. I have not seen the Kato mechanisms so I am not sure about the Con-Cor releases.

Prototype History:
The E7 was a 2,000-horsepower (1,500 kW), A1A-A1A passenger train locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Division of La Grange, Illinois. 428 cab versions, or E7As, were built from February 1945 to April 1949; 82 booster E7Bs were built from March 1945 to July 1948. (Circa 1953 one more E7A was built by the Los Angeles General Shops of the Southern Pacific by rebuilding an E2A.) The 2,000 hp came from two 12 cylinder model 567A engines. Each engine drove its own electrical generator to power the two traction motors on one truck. The E7 was the eighth model in a line of passenger diesels of similar design known as EMD E-units.
In profile the front of the nose of an E7A was less slanted than on earlier EMD passenger locomotives, and the E7, E8, and E9 units have been nicknamed “bulldog nose” units. Some earlier units were called “shovel nose” units or “slant nose” units.

From Wikipedia
Read more on American-Rails.com

Road Name History:
The New York Central Railroad (reporting mark NYC), known simply as the New York Central in its publicity, was a railroad operating in the Northeastern United States. Headquartered in New York City, the railroad served most of the Northeast, including extensive trackage in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, and Massachusetts, plus additional trackage in the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Quebec.

The railroad primarily connected greater New York and Boston in the east with Chicago and St.Louis in the midwest along with the intermediate cities of Albany, Buffalo, Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Detroit. NYC's Grand Central Terminal in New York City is one of its best known extant landmarks.

In 1968 the NYC merged with its former rival, the Pennsylvania Railroad, to form Penn Central (the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad joined in 1969). That company went bankrupt in 1970 and was taken over by the federal government and merged into Conrail in 1976. Conrail was broken up in 1998, and portions of its system was transferred to the newly formed New York Central Lines LLC, a subsidiary leased to and eventually absorbed by CSX and Norfolk Southern. Those companies' lines included the original New York Central main line, but outside that area it included lines that were never part of the New York Central system. CSX was able to take one of the most important main lines in the nation, which runs from New York City and Boston to Cleveland, Ohio, as part of the Water Level Route, while Norfolk Southern gained the Cleveland, Ohio to Chicago, Illinois portion of the line called the Chicago line.

At the end of 1925, the New York Central System operated 11,584 miles (18,643 km) of road and 26,395 miles (42,479 km) of track; at the end of 1967 the mileages were 9,696 miles (15,604 km) and 18,454 miles (29,699 km).

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Con-Cor has been in business since 1962. Many things have changed over time as originally they were a complete manufacturing operation in the USA and at one time had upwards of 45 employees. They not only designed the models,but they also built their own molds, did injection molding, painting, printing and packaging on their models.

Currently, most of their manufacturing has been moved overseas and now they import 90% of their products as totally finished goods, or in finished components. They only do some incidental manufacturing today within the USA.




Item created by: RoadRailer on 2018-09-13 15:42:55

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