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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-01205D - Flatcar, 50 Foot - Wabash - 168

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N Scale - Con-Cor - 0001-01205D - Flatcar, 50 Foot - Wabash - 168


Production Type Regular Production
Stock Number 0001-01205D
Original Retail Price $24.98
Brand Con-Cor
Manufacturer Con-Cor
Body Style Con-Cor Flatcar 50 Foot TOFC
Prototype Flatcar, 50 Foot (Details)
Road or Company Name Wabash (Details)
Reporting Marks WAB
Road or Reporting Number 168
Paint Color(s) Black
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type MT Magne-Matic Knuckle
Coupler Mount Truck-Mount
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
Body Material Plastic
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Flatcar
Model Subtype 50 Foot
Model Variety Fishbelly
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era II: Late Steam (1901 - 1938)
Scale 1/160


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Model Information: Con-Cor designed and produced this model themselves in their Chicago factory. It used the same under frame as their earlier Kato built 50 foot flatcar and hence some are stamped ‘Japan’ on the bottom as they used leftover parts from the earlier model.

Prototype History: A flatcar (US) (also flat car (US) or flat wagon (UIC)) is a piece of railroad (US) or railway (non-US) rolling stock that consists of an open, flat deck mounted on a pair of trucks (US) or bogies (UK), one at each end containing four or six wheels. Occasionally, flat cars designed to carry extra heavy or extra large loads are mounted on a pair (or rarely, more) of bogeys under each end . The deck of the car can be wood or steel, and the sides of the deck can include pockets for stakes or tie-down points to secure loads. Flatcars designed for carrying machinery have sliding chain assemblies recessed in the deck.

Flatcars are used for loads that are too large or cumbersome to load in enclosed cars such as boxcars. They are also often used to transport intermodal containers (shipping containers) or trailers as part of intermodal freight transport shipping.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History: The Wabash Railroad (reporting mark WAB) was a Class I railroad that operated in the mid-central United States. It served a large area, including track in the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, and Missouri and the province of Ontario. Its primary connections included Chicago, Illinois; Kansas City, Missouri; Detroit, Michigan; Buffalo, New York; St. Louis, Missouri; and Toledo, Ohio.

The Wabash's major freight traffic advantage was the direct line from Kansas City to Detroit, without going through St. Louis or Chicago. Despite the Wabash name disappearing in the 1960s, the company continued to exist on paper until being merged into the Norfolk Southern Railway in 1991.

At the end of 1960 Wabash operated 2,423 miles of road on 4,311 miles of track, not including Ann Arbor and NJI&I; that year it reported 6,407 million net ton-miles of revenue freight and 164 million passenger-miles.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information: Con-Cor has been in business since 1962. Many things have changed over time as originally they were a complete manufacturing operation in the USA and at one time had upwards of 45 employees. They not only designed the models,but they also built their own molds, did injection molding, painting, printing and packaging on their models.

Currently, most of their manufacturing has been moved overseas and now they import 90% of their products as totally finished goods, or in finished components. They only do some incidental manufacturing today within the USA.




Item created by: scottakoltz on 2018-08-28 13:09:00. Last edited by gdm on 2018-08-29 07:04:17

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