Search : Mkt:

N Scale - Arnold Hornby - HN2381 - Locomotive, Diesel, SNCF CC 72000 - SNCF - 72065

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

N Scale - Arnold Hornby - HN2381 - Locomotive, Diesel, SNCF CC 72000 - SNCF - 72065 Image Courtesy of Arnold Hornby


Production Type Regular Production
Stock Number HN2381
Original Retail Price 164.50€
Brand Arnold Hornby
Manufacturer Arnold Hornby
Body Style Arnold Hornby Diesel Engine CC 72000
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, SNCF CC 72000 (Details)
Road or Company Name SNCF (Details)
Reporting Marks SNCF
Road or Reporting Number 72065
Paint Color(s) Blue and White
Print Color(s) White
Paint Scheme Bleu Diesel "Arzens"
Coupler Type Rapido Hook NEM Standard Pocket
Coupler Mount Body-Mount
Wheel Type Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile Small Flange (Low Profile)
DCC Readiness Ready
Release Date 2017-03-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype SNCF
Model Variety CC 72000
Prototype Region Europe
Prototype Era Epoch IV (1968-1985)
Years Produced 1967-1974
Scale 1/160


People who viewed this item also viewed: 21123, 139418, 25888, 133848, 135937

Specific Item Information: Logo "Casquette" (cap)

Model Information: Reversible lights (White/Red). Independent third light.
Available in DC or DCC with Sound (reference followed with (S) )

DCC Information: Accepts decoders with Next18 interface.
The (S) versions are factory-equipped with an ESU LokSound micro.

Prototype History:
The CC 72000 is a series of 6-axle C'C' diesel-electric locomotives commissioned by the French state railway SNCF. Initially ordered in December 1965, they were delivered between December 1967 and June 1974. A total of 92 units have been produced. The locomotives were manufactured by Alsthom (now Alstom) and motorized with a SACM AGO 16 cylinders ESHR engine.

Power output: 2,650 kW (3,615 hp)
They were able to deliver 1500V DC for passenger electrical heating.
Thanks to their dual gear ratio, they were able to be used either for passenger service at 140 Km/h or for freight service at 85 Km/h.

There are actually 2 sub-series which differ by their maximum speed:
- CC 72001 to CC 72020 - 140 Km/h
- CC 72021 to CC 72092 - 160 Km/h

Between 2002 and 2004, 30 CC 72000 have been re-motorized with a SEMT-Pielstick V16-PA4-200-VGA engine, allowing a reduction of particle emission by 84%. These re-motorized locomotives are classified as CC 72100 - they retained the last 2 digits of their original number (720xx --> 721xx).
A handful still survive for auxiliary services.

The above description has been created specifically for TroveStar N scale database by Alain LM, as summary in English of the following French publication:
Source: Le Train. Encyclopédie du matériel moteur SNCF. Tome 7: Locomotives, locomoteurs et locotracteurs Diesel (2e partie). ISSN 1296-5537. Olivier Constant. Septembre 2010.

Read more on Wikipedia (in French).

Road Name History:
SNCF (Société Nationale des Chemins de fer Français; "National society of French railways" or "French National Railway Company") is France's national state-owned railway company and manages the rail traffic in France and the Principality of Monaco. SNCF operates the country's national rail services, including the TGV, France's high-speed rail network. Its functions include operation of railway services for passengers and freight, and maintenance and signalling of rail infrastructure.

SNCF employs more than 180,000 people in 120 countries around the globe. The railway network consists of about 32,000 km (20,000 mi) of route, of which 1,800 km (1,100 mi) are high-speed lines and 14,500 km (9,000 mi) electrified. About 14,000 trains are operated daily. The company has its headquarters in Saint Denis (93200), near Paris, 2 place aux Etoiles.

In 2010 SNCF was ranked 22nd in France and 214th globally on the Fortune Global 500 list.

It is the main business of the SNCF group, which in 2014 employed 245,763 people and had 27.2 billion € of sales in 120 countries. The chairman of the SNCF group is Guillaume Pepy.

From Wikipedia

Brand/Importer Information:
Founded in 1906 by Karl Arnold in Nürnberg, K. Arnold & Co. began its life producing tin toys and related items. They produced an extensive line of model ships, doll house items and other toys. In 1935, K. Arnold & Co. hired Max Ernst as their managing director. Ernst, not to be confused with the German realist artist of the same name, was a significant factor in the future of Arnold.

On Max Ernst's 1976 retirement, Arnold employed perhaps 200 to 250 people, using three facilities in the Nuernberg area. The Company continued under family control until 1995, when Arnold went into bankruptcy and was sold to Rivarossi of Italy. Rivarossi, in turn, also went bankrupt, leading to the sale of all assets to Hornby of the United Kingdom. Production is carried out in China.

From Wikipedia


Item created by: Alain LM on 2018-04-08 16:21:31. Last edited by Alain LM on 2018-04-08 16:29:34

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.