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N Scale - Aurora Postage Stamp - 4865 - Flatcar, 50 Foot Depressed Center - Erie - 7300

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N Scale - Aurora Postage Stamp - 4865 - Flatcar, 50 Foot Depressed Center - Erie - 7300


Stock Number 4865
Original Retail Price $2.00
Brand Aurora Postage Stamp
Manufacturer Roco
Body Style Roco Flatcar 50 Foot Depressed Center
Prototype Flatcar, 50 Foot Depressed Center (Details)
Road or Company Name Erie (Details)
Road or Reporting Number 7300
Print Color(s) White
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Deep Flange
Release Date 1968-01-01
Item Category Rolling Stock (Freight)
Model Type Flatcar
Model Subtype 50 Foot
Model Variety Depressed Center
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era III: Transition (1939 - 1957)
Scale 1/160


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Model Information: Roco first produced this model for Minitrix. It appears in the Minitrix 1970 catalog priced at $2.50 each in four road names. It has also been imported by Aurora (and Model Power) for their Postage Stamp Trains brand.

Prototype History: A flatcar (US) (also flat car (US) or flat wagon (UIC)) is a piece of railroad (US) or railway (non-US) rolling stock that consists of an open, flat deck mounted on a pair of trucks (US) or bogies (UK), one at each end containing four or six wheels. Occasionally, flat cars designed to carry extra heavy or extra large loads are mounted on a pair (or rarely, more) of bogeys under each end . The deck of the car can be wood or steel, and the sides of the deck can include pockets for stakes or tie-down points to secure loads. Flatcars designed for carrying machinery have sliding chain assemblies recessed in the deck.

Depressed center flat cars are of a special construction having the portion of floor extending between trucks depressed to provide necessary overhead clearance for lading. When large and heavy loads need to be moved long distances railroads are often the best choice for the job. These loads are often tall enough that they wouldn't pass safely under bridges or other obstacles if carried on conventional flat cars. To provide extra clearance, railroads use heavy-duty, depressed center flat cars. The lower center deck provides several inches of extra clearance, and since the cargo does not have to be lifted as high, loading and unloading is easier.

From Wikipedia

Road Name History: The Erie Railroad (reporting mark ERIE) was a railroad that operated in the northeastern United States, originally connecting New York City - more specifically Jersey City, New Jersey, where Erie's former terminal, long demolished, used to stand - with Lake Erie. It expanded west to Chicago with its 1941 merger with the former Atlantic and Great Western Railroad, also known as the New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio Railroad (NYPANO RR). Its mainline route proved influential in the development and economic growth of the Southern Tier, including cities such as Binghamton, Elmira, and Hornell.

On October 17, 1960, the Erie merged with the former rival Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad to form the Erie Lackawanna Railroad. Most of the former Erie line between Hornell and Binghampton was destroyed in 1972 by the floods of Hurricane Agnes. What was left of the Erie Lackawanna became part of Conrail in 1976.

In 1983, Erie remnants became part of New Jersey Transit rail operations, including its Main Line. Today, most of the surviving Erie Railroad routes are operated by the Norfolk Southern Railway.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information: In 1967, Aurora Plastics Corporation started importing the Minitrix N Scale product line. These trains were marketed as Postage Stamp Trains. It was a bold entry into what would become a very active market in the new N-Scale model train market. The basic starter set took advantage of N-Scale’s small size by packaging everything necessary for a small model railroad in a book-like box. The larger starter sets were packaged in more conventional boxes.

The Body styles of this product line were made in Austria by Roco, imported into the United States by Minitrix and then rebranded by Aurora. Some of the exact same molds were also produced by Roco for Atlas who branded them using their own name.

A lot of information can be found on All about Aurora Postage Stamp Trains web site by David K. Smith.

Manufacturer Information: The company was founded in 1960 by Ing. Heinz Rössler and started with a plastic Minitanks series of military vehicles. After export to the USA became successful, the model line was expanded with model trains in HO scale and the smaller N scale. TT scale was also subsequently added to the product line. The model rail product line covers many European countries including Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg, France, Spain, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, Sweden and the Netherlands, and also the USA.

On July 15, 2005 ROCO Modellspielwaren GmbH was declared bankrupt. From July 25 the company continues as Modelleisenbahn GmbH, but still uses the Roco brand and associated logo. On October 1, 2007, distribution of the 'Minitank' product series was assigned to the German model car manufacturer Herpa.

Since February 2008 Modelleisenbahn also owns Fleischmann, which like Roco had gone bankrupt. The two companies continue as separate brands under Modelleisenbahn GmbH, while benefiting from economies of scale through joined development projects, marketing and procurement.

From Wikipedia


Item created by: gdm on 2017-03-23 08:20:31. Last edited by gdm on 2018-04-23 09:01:58

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