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N Scale - Life-Like - 7702 - Engine, Diesel, DL-109 - Chicago & North Western - 5007A

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N Scale - Life-Like - 7702 - Engine, Diesel, DL-109 - Chicago & North Western - 5007A


Brand Life-Like
Stock Number 7702
Original Retail Price $105.00
Manufacturer Life-Like
Body Style Life-Like Diesel Engine DL-109
Road or Company Name Chicago & North Western (Details)
Reporting Marks CNW
Road or Reporting Number 5007A
Paint Color(s) Yellow and Green
Coupler Type AccuMate Magnetic Knuckle
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Release Date 2005-01-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Alco
Model Variety DL-109
Prototype Engine, Diesel, DL-109
Region North America
Era/Epoch All Eras


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Specific Item Information: Actually DL-107. CNW purchased only one of this locomotive type.

Body Style Information: Life-Like first released in this model in 2005 as part of their 'Proto N' brand. Seven years later, Walthers followed up with a second release in 2012. The second release featured new road numbers for paint schemes from the 2005 release as well as entirely new paint schemes. This N Scale model of the Alco DL-109 locomotive captures the slender lines of this 1940s prototype in a powerful, smooth-running N Scale model. Features include a heavy, split-frame chassis, five-pole motor with dual flywheels, eight-wheel drive, all-wheel electrical pickup and directional LED headlight. Between the finely detailed body (right down to the thin rivet strip around the cab windows) and authentic paint schemes, these units will look perfect on your passenger trains.

The coupler on the nose is an operating "dummy", while the rear coupler is a magnetic knuckle body-mounted coupler, AccuMate for the 2005 Life-Like Proto N release and Micro-Trains for the 2012 Walthers N release. As there are only negligible visual differences between DL-105, DL-107 and DL-109, Life-Like/Walthers produced only one model as DL-109 to stand in for all three types. The DL-109 was the by far the largest run of the series with a total of 62 built.

DCC Information: No provision for DCC in either release.

A DCC decoder installation for this model can be found on the thecentralstation.myfreeforum.org forum.

Prototype Information: The ALCO DL-109 is one of six models of A1A-A1A Diesel locomotives built to haul passenger trains by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) between December, 1939 and April, 1945 ("DL" stands for Diesel Locomotive). They were of a cab unit design, and both cab-equipped lead A units DL-103b, DL-105, DL-107, DL-109 and cabless booster B units DL-108, DL-110 models were built. The units were styled by noted industrial designer Otto Kuhler, who incorporated into his characteristic cab (US Patent D121,219) the trademark three-piece windshield design. A total of 74 cab units and four cabless booster units were built.

Alco's DL-109 marks their early entry into the passenger diesel market in 1940. With its sleek lines, knife-edged nose and long wheelbase, it was ideally suited for high-speed service, and with 2,000 horsepower under the hood, it could handle passengers or high-speed freight with ease. Because of its dual-service capabilities, Alco was allowed to construct the DL-109 in the face of wartime restrictions on passenger-only locos, and the units performed admirably round the clock, handling passengers during the day and freight trains at night. Using lessons learned with the DL-109, it was succeeded by the PA-1 in 1946. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Road/Company Information:
The Chicago and North Western Transportation Company (reporting mark CNW) was a Class I railroad in the Midwestern United States. It was also known as the North Western. The railroad operated more than 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of track as of the turn of the 20th century, and over 12,000 miles (19,000 km) of track in seven states before retrenchment in the late 1970s.

Until 1972, when the company was sold to its employees, it was named the Chicago and North Western Railway. The C&NW became one of the longest railroads in the United States as a result of mergers with other railroads, such as the Chicago Great Western Railway, Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway and others.

By 1995, track sales and abandonment had reduced the total mileage back to about 5,000. The majority of the abandoned and sold lines were lightly trafficked branches in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Large line sales, such as those that resulted in the Dakota, Minnesota and Eastern Railroad further helped reduce the railroad to a mainline core with several regional feeders and branches.

The company was purchased by Union Pacific Railroad (UP) in April 1995 and ceased to exist.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information:
Life-Like Products LLC (now Life-Like Toy and Hobby division of Wm. K. Walthers) was a manufacturer of model railroad products and was based in Baltimore, Maryland.

It was founded in the 1950s by a company that pioneered extruded foam ice chests under the Lifoam trademark. Because ice chests are a summer seasonal item, the company needed a way to keep the factory operating year round. As model railroading was becoming popular in the post-war years, they saw this as an opportunity and so manufactured extruded foam tunnels for model trains. Over the years, Life-Like expanded into other scenery items, finally manufacturing rolling stock beginning in the late 1960s. At some point in the early 1970s, Life-Like purchased Varney Inc. and began to produce the former Varney line as its own.

The Canadian distributor for Life-Like products, Canadian Hobbycraft, saw a missing segment in market for Canadian model prototypes, and started producing a few Canadian models that were later, with a few modifications, offered in the US market with US roadnames.

In 2005, the company, now known as Lifoam Industries, LLC, decided to concentrate on their core products of extruded foam and sold their model railroad operations to Wm. K. Walthers.

Read more on Wikipedia and The Train Collectors Association.


Item created by: Alain LM on 2016-08-08 00:47:40. Last edited by Alain LM on 2016-08-08 00:49:47

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