Search : Mkt:

N Scale - Life-Like - 7660 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco C-424 - Pennsylvania - 2415

Please help support TroveStar. Why?

N Scale - Life-Like - 7660 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco C-424 - Pennsylvania - 2415


N Scale - Life-Like - 7660 - Locomotive, Diesel, Alco C-424 - Pennsylvania - 2415


Stock Number 7660
Original Retail Price $80.00
Brand Life-Like
Manufacturer Life-Like
Body Style Life-Like Diesel Engine C-424/C-425
Prototype Locomotive, Diesel, Alco C-424 (Details)
Road or Company Name Pennsylvania (Details)
Reporting Marks PRR
Road or Reporting Number 2415
Paint Color(s) Brunswick Green
Coupler Type Rapido Hook
Wheel Type Nickel-Silver Plated Metal
Wheel Profile Standard
DCC Readiness No
Announcement Date 2003-11-01
Release Date 2004-06-01
Item Category Locomotives
Model Type Diesel
Model Subtype Alco
Model Variety C-424
Prototype Region North America
Prototype Era Era IV: 2nd Gen Diesel (1958 - 1978)
Scale 1/160


People who viewed this item also viewed: 130687, 103946, 130755, 144346, 109225

Specific Item Information: C-424 rebuilt from RS27 demonstrator 640-1

Model Information: Life-Like Canada (no known as True Line Trains) first introduced this model in 2002. It was a limited edition run with only 180 trains produced for each of 5 paint schemes. In 2003, Life-Like (the USA parent) did a second release of this car in new paint schemes with no production limit. The engine is modern but lacks the capability for a drop-in decoder. It does, however, feature a split-frame, an all-metal chassis, a skew-wound 5-pole motor, dual flywheels, low-friction drive, bi-directional LED lighting, all-wheel drive and pickup (no traction tires), blackened / low-profile wheels, shell-mounted Rapido couplers and all-plastic gearing. The shell details i quire respectable as well with highly-detailed railings.

Assembly instructions of this model on HOseeker.net for the US version and here for the Canadian version.

DCC Information: Unfortunately, there is no support for DCC whatsoever.

A wired DCC decoder installation for this model can be found on Brad Myers' N-scale DCC decoder installs blog or on David Harris's Web Page.

Also watch this video "N scale C424 diesel Life Like TCS M1 DCC decoder installation by AK Crazy Russian with DCCTRAIN":


Prototype History: The ALCO Century 424 was a four-axle, 2,400 hp (1,790 kW) diesel-electric locomotive of the road switcher type. 190 were built between April 1963 and May 1967. Cataloged as a part of Alco's Century line of locomotives, the C424 was intended to replace the earlier RS-27 model and offered as a lower-priced alternative to the C425. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

Montreal Locomotive Works also built this locomotive as MLW Century 424 for Canadian railroads. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

The ALCO Century 425 was a four-axle, 2,500 hp (1,860 kW) diesel-electric locomotive of the road switcher type. 91 were built between October 1964 and December 1966. Cataloged as part of ALCO's "Century" line of locomotives, the C425 was an upgraded version of the C424. Full data sheet on The Diesel Workshop.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Road Name History: The Pennsylvania Railroad (reporting mark PRR) was an American Class I railroad, founded in 1846. Commonly referred to as the "Pennsy," the PRR was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The PRR was the largest railroad by traffic and revenue in the U.S. for the first half of the twentieth century. Over the years, it acquired, merged with or owned part of at least 800 other rail lines and companies. At the end of 1925, it operated 10,515 miles of rail line; in the 1920s, it carried nearly three times the traffic as other railroads of comparable length, such as the Union Pacific or Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads. Its only formidable rival was the New York Central (NYC), which carried around three-quarters of PRR's ton-miles.

At one time, the PRR was the largest publicly traded corporation in the world, with a budget larger than that of the U.S. government and a workforce of about 250,000 people. The corporation still holds the record for the longest continuous dividend history: it paid out annual dividends to shareholders for more than 100 years in a row.

In 1968, PRR merged with rival NYC to form the Penn Central Transportation Company, which filed for bankruptcy within two years. The viable parts were transferred in 1976 to Conrail, which was itself broken up in 1999, with 58 percent of the system going to the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS), including nearly all of the former PRR. Amtrak received the electrified segment east of Harrisburg.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Brand/Importer Information: Life-Like Products LLC (now Life-Like Toy and Hobby division of Wm. K. Walthers) was a manufacturer of model railroad products and was based in Baltimore, Maryland.

It was founded in the 1950s by a company that pioneered extruded foam ice chests under the Lifoam trademark. Because ice chests are a summer seasonal item, the company needed a way to keep the factory operating year round. As model railroading was becoming popular in the post-war years, they saw this as an opportunity and so manufactured extruded foam tunnels for model trains. Over the years, Life-Like expanded into other scenery items, finally manufacturing rolling stock beginning in the late 1960s. At some point in the early 1970s, Life-Like purchased Varney Inc. and began to produce the former Varney line as its own.

The Canadian distributor for Life-Like products, Canadian Hobbycraft, saw a missing segment in market for Canadian model prototypes, and started producing a few Canadian models that were later, with a few modifications, offered in the US market with US roadnames.

In 2005, the company, now known as Lifoam Industries, LLC, decided to concentrate on their core products of extruded foam and sold their model railroad operations to Wm. K. Walthers.

In June 2018, Atlas and Walthers announced to have reached an agreement under which all Walthers N scale rolling stock tooling, including the former Life-Like tooling, will be purchased by Atlas.

Read more on Wikipedia and The Train Collectors Association.


Item created by: Alain LM on 2016-08-07 02:30:25. Last edited by gdm on 2018-06-01 11:52:15

If you see errors or missing data in this entry, please feel free to log in and edit it. Anyone with a Gmail account can log in instantly.