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HO Scale - Rapido Trains - 109042 - Pullman Standard Osgood Bradley 10 Window Lightweight Coach - Boston & Maine - 4585

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HO Scale - Rapido Trains - 109042 - Pullman Standard Osgood Bradley 10 Window Lightweight Coach - Boston & Maine - 4585

Brand/Importer Rapido Trains
Stock Number 109042
Original Retail Price $74.95
Body Style Description Passenger Coach Lightweight 10-Window Osgood Bradley
Road/Company Name Boston & Maine (Details)
Road/Reporting Number 4585
Paint Color(s) Pullman Green
Body Construction Injection Molded Plastic
Coupler Type Macdonald-Cartier
Wheel-Set Type/Construction Chemically Blackened Metal
Wheel Profile RP25
Multipack No
Recommended Age Group 12+
Announcement Date 0000-00-00
Release Date 0000-00-00
Item Category Rolling Stock
Model Type Passenger Car
Model Subtype Coach
Model Variety Lightweight 10-Window Unskirted Pullman Standard Osgood Bradley
Prototype Description Pullman Standard Osgood Bradley 10 Window Lightweight Coach
Region North America

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Brand/Importer Information: Rapido Trains Inc. is a high-end manufacturer of model trains and accessories in HO, OO and N (North American 1:160 and British 1:148) scales.

The firm's mission is to recreate the entire rail travel experience, from fully-detailed interiors and under-frames on models to fully-wired telephone poles for model railroads.

The name RAPIDO was introduced by Canadian National in 1965 to headline the railway's high-speed intercity passenger services.

Until the mid-1980s, RAPIDO stood for fast schedules, frequent trains, and superb service.

Today, Rapido Trains continues the RAPIDO concept with state-of-the-art models and attention to fine detail.

Not related to the venerable (and now defunct) German manufacturer Arnold Rapido, nor the present-day Arnold (which is owned by the United Kingdom's Hornby), Canadian based Rapido Trains was founded in 2003.

Body Style Information: Available in fully, partially, or non-skirted versions, with or without roof hatches (as appropriate), with GE or Frigidaire air conditioning equipment (as appropriate), the Rapido Trains Osgood Bradley Lightweight 10-Window Coaches have complete and accurate interior detail (including bulkhead mirrors), correct, tubular cross section flush windows with painted frames, full under-body detailing (with separate air, steam, and electrical lines), brake hoses and end gates, exquisite 41-E trucks with chain detail and metal RP25 wheel-sets, Easy-Peasy battery operating lighting, factory installed, separate grab irons, and accurate paint and lettering schemes.

Precisely scaled from the original factory blueprints, with several car numbers for each paint scheme offered, the models have a minimum operating radius of twenty-four inches.

Prototype Information: Designed by Walter Dorwin Teague in the early 1930s, beginning in 1934, the attractive, lightweight, rounded aircraft style bodied Pullman Standard Osgood Bradley passenger cars were manufactured in Pullman Standard's Osgood Bradley plant in Worcester, Connecticut.

The line's first truly lightweight coaches, the New York New Haven and Hartford Railroad was the largest customer of these 10-window cars.

Osgood Bradley's were used on long distance and local passenger trains and saw continued use well into the 1970s.

Road/Company Information:
The Andover and Wilmington Railroad was incorporated March 15, 1833, to build a branch from the Boston and Lowell Railroad at Wilmington, Massachusetts, north to Andover, Massachusetts. The line opened to Andover on August 8, 1836. The name was changed to the Andover and Haverhill Railroad on April 18, 1837, reflecting plans to build further to Haverhill, Massachusetts (opened later that year), and yet further to Portland, Maine, with the renaming to the Boston and Portland Railroad on April 3, 1839, opening to the New Hampshire state line in 1840.

The Boston and Maine Railroad was chartered in New Hampshire on June 27, 1835, and the Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts Railroad was incorporated March 12, 1839, in Maine, both companies continuing the proposed line to South Berwick, Maine. The railroad opened in 1840 to Exeter, New Hampshire, and on January 1, 1842, the two companies merged with the Boston and Portland to form a new Boston and Maine Railroad.

The B&M flourished with the growth of New England's mill towns in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but still faced financial struggles. It came under the control of J. P. Morgan and his New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad around 1910, but anti-trust forces wrested control back. Later it faced heavy debt problems from track construction and from the cost of acquiring the Fitchburg Railroad, causing a reorganization in 1919.

By 1980, though still a sick company, the B&M started turning around thanks to aggressive marketing and its purchase of a cluster of branch lines in Connecticut. The addition of coal traffic and piggyback service also helped. In 1983 the B&M emerged from bankruptcy when it was purchased by Timothy Mellon's Guilford Transportation Industries for $24 million. This was the beginning of the end of the Boston & Maine corporate image, and the start of major changes, such as the labor issues which caused the strikes of 1986 and 1987, and drastic cost cutting such as the 1990 closure of B&M's Mechanicville, New York, site, the largest rail yard and shop facilities on the B&M system.

Guilford Rail System changed its name to Pan Am Railways in 2006. Technically, Boston & Maine Corporation still exists today but only as a non-operating ward of PAR. Boston & Maine owns the property (and also employs its own railroad police), while Springfield Terminal Railway, a B&M subsidiary, operates the trains and performs maintenance. This complicated operation is mainly due to more favorable labor agreements under Springfield Terminal's rules.

Read more on Wikipedia.

Item created by: nscalemodeler160 on 2016-08-05 01:22:36. Last edited by nscalemodeler160 on 2016-08-05 04:22:36

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